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  • 2016 BBON Certificate of Excellence: Choha Kim and Anabel King

    10 months ago by

    Logo_Brea-Centennial_LOGO-1


      October 30, 2016

        Beautiful Brea Old & New (BBON) is proud to award a certificate of excellence in the area of journalism and academics to Brea Olinda High School (BOHS) senior students and BBON team members, Choha Kim and Anabel King for their contribution in the area of journalism and academics on BBON. For the past two years, both Kim and King have contributed noteworthy community online news articles of interest focusing primarily on BOHS. We applaud Kim and King for a job well done and look forward to their stories and engaging posts on social media in the weeks and months ahead as we countdown to our centennial celebration.

  • Brea Police Department to wear badges commemorating city centennial

    10 months ago by

    Brea Police Department will be wearing commemorative centennial badge in 2017 similar to the historic constable shield style.

    Brea Police Department Officers will be wearing a commemorative centennial badge in 2017, similar to the historic constable shield style shown. Collage photo courtesy of Brea Historical Society


      “I don’t know where the original historic badge is. I haven’t seen it myself,” said Brea’s historian Officer Celmer. The image of the nostalgic badge has been used in various departmental printing such as their annual report (shown in the bottom photo.)

        Everyone in town is getting geared up for our centennial year in 2017 including Brea Police Officers, who be sporting a full size constable shield badge. In the place of CAL will be the City of Brea seal. 1917 will be on the left side and 2017 on the right, marking 100 years, along with a rank and ID number on the bottom.

          The Brea PD's centennial badge will surely be a special one as its style will be similar to the Deputy Constable Brea Township Badge back in the day.

  • Brea’s First Children’s Book: Whimsy Centennial History Lesson

    10 months ago by

    I’m bursting with excitement as I write this update about Brea’s timely project, the city’s 1st children’s book featuring historic icon Charlie’s Clock aka "Charlie the Clock" in time travel – celebrating 100 years in Brea!


      Charlie the Clock as drawn by Illustrator, Heather Ashlyn Collins, 2006 BOHS grad and recent CSUF grad.

      "Charlie the Clock" as drawn by Illustrator, Heather Ashlyn Collins, 2006 BOHS grad and recent CSUF grad.


        Not only will this whimsy book serve as a learning tool in getting children interested in history, but also it will inspire the young at heart!

          Team "Charlie the Clock" is an independent project consisting of three book team members, community collaboration for book sub-projects, along with a whole lot of support from educators, and people in the the City of Brea and beyond! Thank you all!

            There will be community book characters such as many BOUSD grade school children! How cute is that!

              The book team members:

                Teresa Hampson author of Brea: Celebrating 75 Years is the author.

                  Heather Ashlyn Collins, 2006 BOHS and recent CSUF grad, who drew Charlie the Clock caricature, is the illustrator

                    And I am serving as the creative director and production manager.

                      When completed, we hope you will enjoy it and treasure it for years to come, as its takes a village and patience in producing a noteworthy wonderful project.

                        Team "Charlie the Clock" magical details to come soon!

  • Ode to the days of Brea Police Posse

    11 months ago by

    Giddy up! Born in the Old West, let's take a trot down Brea Pd's memory lane!

    Shown collectible and rare, Brea police posse badges.  Courtesy of  Brea PD historian, Officer Celmer

    Shown are Brea police posse badges, collectible and rare. Courtesy of Brea PD historian, Officer Celmer


      Founded in 1956 with eight members, the City of Brea had a police posse comprised of academy volunteers. The members were deputized if necessary, 21 years or older, possessed a horse and a trailer, and were either residents of Brea or neighboring cities.

        These men were dedicated to serve undergoing a rigid screening process by the governing board, after receiving approval from the police department.

          img_1612 They possessed the utmost horsemanship and marksmanship skills, purchasing their own uniforms and gear to get the job done. The members were skilled in first aid and required to respond 24/7 if needed.

            Separately charted and self-governed, the group worked closely with the Brea PD in coordinating functions such as search and rescue and assisting with traffic problems. They partook in monthly meetings and three shoots a year. Among other activities, they participated in the City of Brea 4th of July parades. And held social ride get-togethers once a month.

              But it wasn't always pleasant as these posse riders were ready for alarming situations such as in 1968, when Officer Nelson Sasscer, a Santa Ana police officer was killed while stopping a motorist. Posse members were summoned to assist in searching the canyons for the suspect’s car, which went out of control when the driver abruptly exited while being chased by Brea Police Officer, Jim Smith.

                According to Brea PD Officer Jason Celmer, police historian, the Posse ceased being an active element at the PD in the late 70’s/early 80’s.

                  Three photos of Police Posse member, Shannon Barnes, were sent to Officer Celmer from Shannon’s daughter-in-law Cecelia along with the News Tribune article titled, “Police Posse Seeks Members.” Courtesy of Brea PD historian, Officer Celmer

                  Three photos of Police Posse member, Shannon Barnes, were sent to Officer Celmer from Shannon’s daughter-in-law Cecelia along with the News Tribune article titled, “Police Posse Seeks Members.” Courtesy of Brea PD historian, Officer Celmer


                    Celmer is reaching out and asking anyone who has any items related to the history of Brea PD in their possession, and would like to donate them, to please contact him via email at JasonC@ci.brea.ca.us. Celmer notes: of particular interest related to this article would be the Badge, and the Brea PD horse blanket that is just barely visible beneath Shannon’s saddle in the close up photo.

                      Taylor, Dave "Police Posse Seeks Members" News Tribune September 1972

  • Country Hills Elementary 2nd Annual Color Run Fundraiser

    11 months ago by

    Country Hills Elementary School PTA's 1st Annual Color Run Fundraiser. Principal Trish Walsh poses as "The Face of Brea" with many of her students!! Charlie the Clock cutout is invited to the 2nd Annual Color Run Fundraiser!

    Country Hills Elementary
    School PTA's 1st Annual Color Run Fundraiser. Principal Trish Walsh poses as "The Face of Brea" with many of her students!! Charlie the Clock caricature cutout is invited to the 2nd Annual Color Run Fundraiser!


      Country Hills Elementary School PTA's 2nd Annual Color Run Fundraiser will be roaring fun on Friday, October 28, 2016. 100% of the proceeds will be used for the enrichment of every student in our school. The event is the school's biggest fundraiser of the year, supporting the PTA operating budget that includes, but is not limited to, art programs, music programs, assemblies, field trips, etc. Our school goal this year is to raise $25,000.

        The Color Run is not a race; it is a fun, fitness-oriented event at which all students may participate. TK through 2nd grade have a 15 minute heat beginning at 9:30am. 3rd through 6th grade have a 20 minute heat beginning at 10am. Aside from helping our school, there are many incredible prizes to be won! Go Cougars!

          Country Hills Elementary School -- Principal Trish Walsh

  • Brea PD Historian, Officer Celmer, to share historical collection with BBON

    11 months ago by

    Who knew Brea has a police historian? Officer Jason Celmer, the historian for Brea PD, preceded Officer Dennis Gray when he retired.


      Many of you longtime residents of Brea may know Jason Celmer, as his family has been residing in the city for many decades. Celmer attended Montessori of Brea, followed by Arovisita Elemenary School, Brea Junior High, and Brea Olinda High School, graduating in 1993. BOHS Class of 1993 was the first class to complete all four years at the new high school located on Wildcat Way, said Celmer.

        Can you find Officer Jason Celmer? In the picture dating back to February 17, 1996, Celmer poses along with fellow Brea Cadet Tac team. Courtesy of Jason Celmer.

        Can you find Officer Jason Celmer? In the picture dating back to February 17, 1996, Celmer poses along with fellow Brea PD Tac Team. Courtesy of Jason Celmer.


          While talking to Celmer at the police station in his office, he was taking down memory lane reminiscing about orange groves, old Brea Downtown with one lane in each direction, and the unique downtown Chinese themed Red Lantern Theater, which opened in 1922 and closed in the 1970’s.

            In his early teens, his longtime career with the city began 27 years ago working as a basketball coach in the community services division at the age of 15 1/2 years old. Current Assistant City Manager, Chris Emeterio, who is also a longtime Brean, hired him. Nineteen of those years, he has served as a Brea PD officer, hired in January of 1997.

              “I’ve been self-described a history geek my entire life.” chuckled Celmer. I especially enjoy touching history and going places and seeing things where I can lay my hands on it and be in the places,’’ he said.

                His predecessor, former Officer Gray, who lives nearby in Fullerton, often connect regarding police memorabilia. Way back then, Gray started writing history for the Brea PD, storing a lot of information. His history flyers are still given out, though not up-to-date, because his collection of history stopped in 2001-2002 when Gray retired, according to Celmer. “Everything that I have been trying to save for the last 10 or 15 years are things that he collected and essentially left to me, as being the local person who was interested in history,” replied Celmer.

                  Celmer became the go-to person taking over Gray’s presentations in the citizen’s academy for the department of history. He receives emails containing historical information; people drop things off at the front desk such as a retiree’s 1960’s badge, from the family of Chief Atkins. He also works with organizations such as the Brea Historical Society when they contact him.

                    Bin of Brea PD police memorabilia. Courtesy Jason Celmer.

                    Bin of Brea PD police memorabilia. Courtesy Jason Celmer.


                      Something’s are unidentifiable. On top of the memorabilia pile seen in his office, lays a wood frame of an unknown officer posed in front of a house. Celmer said, “Nobody on staff knows who is it.” There is not a description on the photograph, but he and his fellow officers figure it can be traced back to the 1940’s.

                        Celmer is very busy. He is the president of Brea PD Association and also the department’s liaison for the Brea PD Alumni, which he refers to as the “Old Fogies,” saying some of them don’t mind the title.

                          Although he wears many hats, he still manages his time well and is trying his best to carry the torch in preserving Brea PD's rich history.

                            A fun spirited person, it will be an honor and joy working with Officer Celmer in sharing our police department's history--as we celebrate 100 years in 2017!

  • California is the first state to teach LGBT history in schools

    11 months ago by

    With a unanimous vote by the California State Board of Education in July, California public schools will now teach LGBT history. The State Board will implement a 2011 state law signed by Gov. Jerry Brown which requires schools to include LGBT history as early as second grade. This decision will make California the first state in the nation to teach LGBT history in school textbooks.


      According to Peter Tira, information officer for the California Department of Education, the policy will go into effect immediately across California elementary, middle, and high school history classes, in time for the 2016-2017 school year. Tira also adds that there is a 2017 deadline for school textbooks to include LGBT content.

        At BOHS, the Social Science Department has not developed new plans as of yet to implement the new curriculum, according to Matt Rainwater, department head. However, Rainwater, along with fellow history teacher, Brian Schlueter, already include LGBT history as part of their civil rights unit, as both believe inclusion of the LGBT community is essential to teaching American history. Regarding the deadline, Rainwater notes that a majority of current history textbooks at BOHS are “almost as old as the students who study them” as many date back to 2002.

          However, at lower schools, such inclusion is not as. According to Trish Walsh, Country Hills Elementary School principal, the school currently teaches the curriculum adopted by the BOUSD School Board of Education, but no plans have been made to adopt new social studies textbooks as of yet.

            “Our students will enter college classrooms and the workplace in the next few years and they’re going to come across people of many different backgrounds. To assume that a place of higher education or any workplace is purely a heterosexual workplace would be very wrong. We have not just people of different ethnic backgrounds, but people of different gender identities and sexualities amongst us. And to pretend that they don’t exist is not just doing a disservice to them but a disservice to them as global citizens,” Eugene Lee, history teacher, said.

              From second grade, students will learn about diverse family structures, such as families with LGBT parents, to help students “locate themselves and their own families in history and learn about the lives and historical struggles of their peers,” according to the text of the framework.

                The BOHS Gay-Straight Alliance Club president Alisa Fang, junior, believes this addition is a huge step for the LGBT community. “For California to implement LGBTQ history into school textbooks is...amazing, for lack of a better word. LGBT youth are more likely to suffer bullying in school, suffer from depression, and commit suicide. This is not okay. People are substituting something as innocent and pure as love with hate and intolerance. I hope that with the aid of LGBTQ history into schools, this vicious cycle can be broken. By including LGBTQ history in our history books, we are not only acknowledging the sacrifices made, but we are also changing the perspective of future generations to a more open-minded one (hopefully).”

                  Tom Torlakson, California Superintendent of Public Instruction, believes that the inclusion of LGBT history is “a big win for our students.” “This document will improve the teaching and learning of history and social science. It will give our students access to the latest historical research and help them learn about the diversity of our state and the contributions of people and groups who may not have received the appropriate recognition in the past,” Torlakson said.

                    Critics of the state decision, such as the National Association of Scholars and Breitbart News, believe the ruling is “absurd” and “the height of political correctness”. But others applaud the move, noting that this furthers California’s history of progressivism.

                      “This is a small world, this is an ephemeral life, a temporary life we live,” Lee said. “And for us to exclude people based on their gender identity is not only wrong -- it’s going to push us behind. There are many [LGBT] people who serve in the military, who are in the entertainment industry, who are teachers, who are students, and they all deserve a voice. And I think California as a progressive state is doing an outstanding job leading the nation once again in what a progressive state looks like.”

                        Author: Anabel King

                          Anabel King is a student reporter for Beautiful Brea Old and New. You can contact this writer at anabelking7@gmail.com.

  • Country Hills student, Marissa Valencia, is Honda’s space camp girl

    11 months ago by

    Have you been watching the Honda commercial in which a thrilled and surprised 9-year-old is awarded a trip to Space Camp? The girl in the unscripted commercial is none other than Brea Country Hills Elementary student Marissa Valencia.

    Marissa Valencia, 9, a Country Hills student, is featured in a Honda commercial. Honda gave her a trip to space camp in Alabama. She is shown with the "Helpful Honda guy." Courtesy of SoCal Honda

    Marissa Valencia, 9, a Country Hills student, is featured in a Honda commercial. Honda gave her a trip to space camp in Alabama. She is shown with the "Helpful Honda guy." Courtesy of SoCal Honda


      Her mother, Nina, said it seems like all of Brea has bonded over seeing her on TV or the internet.

        Marissa is fascinated with anything to do with science and visits Columbia Memorial Space Center in Downey once a month to learn more. It was there that a casting director came looking for kids.

          The well-spoken fourth grader won a trip to Space Camp courtesy of Honda, and attended along with her father. The company gave her an astronaut outfit (Her father got so “into it” that he purchased one as well!).

            At Camp, Marissa was busy all day, but her two most memorable experiences were going on simulated space missions and building a rocket she was able to bring home.

              Now, more than ever, Marisa Valencia wants to be, “the first woman to touch the moon.”

                Catch her ad online by entering keywords, "Honda" and "space camp."

                  Any news? Give Susan a jingle at (714)529-8561 or e-mail her at suzgaede@aol.com

  • Mother’s Market Brea to Celebrate 5-year Anniversary

    11 months ago by

    MMKlogo We Love Brea Businesses anniversary milestone parties!


      Put another candle on the birthday cake -- as Mother’s Market & Kitchen’s Brea store located at 413 S. Associated Rd. will be celebrating its 5th year anniversary this Saturday, September 17 from 10a.m.-1p.m.

        There will be FREE samples from Mother’s popular juice bar and deli will be served in addition to a celebration cake from their bakery! Several vendors will be on hand offering samples of the latest products as well.

          There will also be a drawing for giveaways, including various gift baskets and Mother’s gift cards.

            Free admission—Lots of Fun!!

  • Brea Kiwanis Club’s back-to-school shopping gets an A

    12 months ago by

    I love shoes and remember going shoe shopping with my mom and begging to wear the new pair home.


      I liked nothing better than seeing my old shoes placed in the box and looking down at the new pair on my feet. Pure joy for a 9-year-old.

        But there are kids in our community who don’t often have brand new pair of shoes, nor many clothes that are not hand-me-downs or thrift store bargains. No joy in that.

          But joy comes to the kids who are chosen by their school principals to partake in the Brea Kiwanis’ annual back-to-school shopping trip at JC Penney in the Brea Mall.

            Since 1998, the Brea Kiwanis Club has partnered with JC Penney ll to offer a special Saturday morning back to school shopping trip. Last year, Soroptimist of Brea/La Habra, of which I am a member, also donated funds and volunteers to help shop, as did Placentia Kiwanians. We all shopped for 64 children.

              This year, through funds raised by the Kiwanis, Soroptimist, Brea Citizens Bank and La Floresta/Chevron, about 70 children are receiving new clothes and shoes.

                The parents are not allowed into the store, but there is seating for them in the lower level parking structure. JC Penney even provides coffee and doughnuts.

                  Prior to the big shopping day, the children are given a letter for their parents explaining the program, a list to be filled out regarding sizes and colors for the child. Clothing bought can only be exchanged in the child’s size, not refunded.

                    Each child will have a shopper from the Kiwanis or Soroptimist or the Kiwanis’ Brea Olinda High Key Club, who will shop the children’s department with them and have $100 per child to spend.

                      I was a shopper last year and shopped with two different children. First was a 9-year old boy who headed first for the $75 famous name shoes. I guided him away from them and to the jeans, shirts and socks, where our $100 could go farther. He picked out some clothes he liked and Mom would approve of, and then we headed to the sale shoes where he found famous name shoes within our budget that fit and he loved. We had enough left over for new undies and pajamas too. Of course, if JC Penney had not put nearly everything in the children’s departments on sale, that $100 would not have gone as far.

                        Not only will lots of cool clothes be on sale, but the JC Penney’s staff work on their own time, and many of them prior to their regular Saturday shift. “Penney’s staff raise money themselves and donate to us to help more children,” said Dean Hall, Brea Kiwanis president, “this year they raised $500 for five children.”

                          Next Sept. 10 will be another Kiwanis’ back to school shopping morning at JC Penney. I can’t wait.

                            Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net.

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