Brea Old and New: The go-to source for "All things Brea"!

‘All things Brea’

  • Tick-Tock… Charlie the Rockin’ Clock in Brea History’s Biggest Hits!

    4 weeks ago by

    Giving Thanks this November!


      Hi Brea Old and New followers! I hope all is well with you! Many thanks to you for subscribing to our local good news! We greatly appreciate it!! Today, I’m writing to give you an update regarding the city of Brea’s 1st young person’s book — Charlie the Rockin’ Clock in Brea History’s Biggest Hits! Click here to read the background of this amazing community-oriented centennial project.

        Pacific Electric Red Cars finally reach what will be Brea in 1910, at last linking the isolated townsite with the wider world.
        Teresa Hampson, author of Charlie the Rockin' Clock in Brea History's Biggest Hits! Illustrator, 2006 BOHS grad and recent CSUF grad, Heather Ashlyn Collins


          This project has been in the making for 18 months now. We have experienced the usual delays in executing a project along with unexpected problems.

            After a major setback, the author, Teresa Hampson, and I will be working together in seeking sponsorship dollars needed to publish the book.

              I’m thankful for all the people who have been supporting this project, in and outside of the community!

                Currently, I have a Fullerton College student who is interested in drawing the dimensions needed to make a Charlie the Clock mascot.

                  Charlie the Clock has touched people worldwide on Instagram! People like the cute time traveling historic clock whose mission is to make people smile ☺ while piquing their interest in history!

                    It’s been a long journey to move this project along. Unfortunately, the centennial book will not get published this year. We project that it will be accomplished early next year! Better late than never!!

                      Relative to other cities in Orange County, we are small, yet big enough as I'm always learning that a lot of people don't know about Brea's centennial book yet.

                        I'm doing my best to spread the word about our young person's history book, and ask that you hop-on the Brea train to help raise awareness of Brea's unique centennial book - a once-in-a-lifetime special treasure!

                          Should you have any questions -- do not hesitate to contact me.

                            Thanks again for your support!

                              Wishing you and yours a joyous holiday season!!

                                P.S. Farrell's Brea is naming an ice cream sundae after Charlie the Clock!! How cool is that!! Hint: The last chapter named: Party Time! takes place in Brea Downtown and ends on a high note with special guests arriving to celebrate..

                                  Best,

                                    Carolyn Campbell

  • Sparkle & Glitz – Bessie the Brea Beader

    3 months ago by

    Brea


      I wonder how many local people remember former Brea resident Bessie Nelson (known to many as the Brea Beader), who gave glitz to so many entertainment and political stars?

        Bessie Nelson, known to many as Bessie the Brea Beader, gives glitz to many entertainment and political stars. She is shown with daughter Bessie.(Courtesy of Vita Zol)


          Bessie’s talented touch added the gleam of rhinestones, sequins, bugle beads and more to Michael Jackson’s glove, Neil Diamond’s jackets, Liberace’s capes, Joan Rivers’ blouses and Cher’s evening dresses, not to mention Nancy Reagan’s and Hillary Clinton’s inaugural ball gowns.

            We remember one year when Bessie’s daughter, also known as Bessie, was involved in Brea Olinda High School’s dance production program and her mom volunteered to hand bead costumes for all the girls – at the same time she was running back and forth to Hollywood doing beading for top designers! Bessie moved to New Jersey several years ago to be closer to family, and once word got out, Broadway came calling. She did beading for shows from “Dreamgirls” and “Sunset Boulevard” to “Miss Saigon,” “Wicked” and “The Boy From Oz,” but her biggest project of all was embellishing 31 costumes for the national tour of “A Chorus Line.”

              Now 86 years young, Bessie keeps her needle busy, recently beading dresses for Bette Midler and her understudies for the Broadway production of “Hello Dolly!” and adding glam to the outfits of all the Radio City Rockettes for a Chase Bank TV commercial. She’s currently working on costumes for “Frozen,” which is expected to open on Broadway next spring.

                In a world filled with labor-saving devices, beading is one thing that still must be done by hand, one tiny piece at a time. Bessie, who learned the art from her aunt at the age of 9, said she is sad that, even though demand remains high, beading seems to be a dying art. “They haven’t found a way yet for a machine to do it,” she laughed. Which is fine, as long as folks like Bessie the Brea Beader are still there to keep people in stitches.

                  Any news? Give Susan Gaede a jingle (714)529-8561..or email her at suzgaede@aol.com.

  • The Cal Rehab Crew

    4 months ago by

    Whether its orthopedic, neurological or other, many of us seek physical therapy to help us recover. Right now under my insurance plan, I am seeing a physical therapist for epicondylitis aka elbow pain. I believe my pain comes from holding my iPhone 24/7 - iPhone Elbow is the new Tennis Elbow, ouch! Laugh if you may, but it can happen to you too! So be careful. Physical therapy works!


      Bryan Stewart, DPT at California Rehabilitation & Sports Therapy in Brea.


        Have you sought help from California Rehabilitation & Sports Therapy located in Brea on the corner of Lambert Road and Tamarack Avenue? The company was established over 25 years ago in Huntington Beach. Currently, there are nine company locations in Orange County and two facilities in Los Angeles County.

          I had the pleasure of talking to Doctor of Physical Therapy Bryan Stewart, a team member of the Cal Brea Rehab Crew.

            The Cal Rehab Crew
            Pictured L to R:
            Tracie Weaver, Front Desk Specialist, Courtney Mears, PT Aide, Bryan Stewart, DPT, OCS, Clinic Director/Managing Partner, Saloni Parikh, OTR/L Occupational Therapist, Scott Crutchfield, DPT, Staff PT, Eunice Rhee, OT Aide. (Not Pictured: Donovan Johnson, OT Aide, Miguel Cartagena, PT Aide)


              BBON: When did you join the team at California Rehab & Sports Therapy?

                Bryan Stewart, DPT:I joined Cal Rehab at the end of 2012.

                  BBON: When did you discover that you wanted to pursue a career in PT?

                    Bryan Stewart, DPT: I dealt with shoulder and elbow pain in high school and that started to peak my attention.

                      BBON: What is a typical day like for you?

                        Bryan Stewart, DPT: A typical day starts by getting coffee and reading some business or PT related material from 545-645am Get to the clinic by 645 to 7am. Tackling administrative things, catching up with doctors, replying to emails then starting to see patients from 8am to 7pm MWF, T and Th are similar but done at 1pm. Occasionally I do marketing after work on T or Th. I am also involved with Orange County, state and national PT associations and have some time commitments associated with that also.

                          BBON: How has PT technology advanced since you entered the field?

                            Bryan Stewart, DPT: Technology has advanced with anything from Telehealth in remote areas consulting patients to wearable technology to assess and look at motion capture to texting application to communicate with patients. Definitely tech has infinite possibilities in PT.

                              BBON: How do you motivate people who need PT but don't stick to the program, and complain about pain? Sadly, many of us are in that group.

                                Bryan Stewart, DPT: I try to take a team approach in motivation to stick to a program. I try to line up what THEIR goals with mine with regards to range of motion, strength, pain and function. Some patients need a swift kick in the rear end and others need a more hand held approach. Knowing how to have that conversation with each patient I think makes for a good situation/experience in PT.

                                  BBON: Does the company participate in community events?

                                    Bryan Stewart, DPT: We try to have a booth at the Brea Wellness Festival every year. We have done at least 4 in my tenure at Cal Rehab. Would love to be more involved in more community events in the future!

                                      BBON: What advice would you give to PT students?

                                        Bryan Stewart, DPT: Don't adhere to one way of doing things. Be open to ideas and collaboration with other PT's as well as other disciplines (chiro, strength and conditioning, personal trainers, massage therapists, etc). Also, get early business knowledge!

                                          BBON: What do you like to do on your days off?

                                            Bryan Stewart, DPT: What days off?!? Ha, just kidding. I try to play some golf or hit an Angel game with my wife and son (he's 6 months old so he's sort of a "spectator"! We try to get down to the beach when we can or do a little traveling also.

                                              BBON: As a PT you interact with clients daily. You must have many stories of inspiration to share. Can you tell us one?

                                                Bryan Stewart, DPT: Getting to see patients not only go back to work but also back to their sport. Or even just playing with their grand-kids again. I'm not the greatest story teller but we've got a few testimonials and Yelp reviews that show some patient stories.

                                                  BBON: "Good Old Brea" is celebrating 100 years old. Were you shocked to find out, and what do you like best about the city of Brea?

                                                    Bryan Stewart, DPT: I actually was! I like the layout of Brea. It has it's little pockets form downtown to over by the clinic towards Fullerton and then over by Whole Foods it just seems to roll along. hard to explain! But there really no "bad" parts of Brea as seen in other cities.

  • 1998 BOHS grad, Mark Rober, breaks record for world’s largest Nerf gun

    4 months ago by

    Mark Rober Guinness World Records 2016 Photo Credit: James Ellerker/Guinness World Records

    BOHS class of 1998 graduate Mark Rober recently has been packing some pretty big heat. What’s more, he’s used it to blast his way into the Guinness World Records 2017: Blockbusters! book.

      To win an office “arms race” not long after he started a new engineering job in Silicon Valley, Rober spent several weeks designing and building an incredibly high-powered toy weapon that’s recently been recognized as “the world’s largest Nerf gun.” At six feet long, his super-sized creation combines a toilet plunger with a paint ball pressure tank to shoot foam pool-noodle bullets up to 50 yards at 40 mph.

        For Rober, who collected Guinness World Records books as a youngster, his new title is a dream come true. “It’s really cool to make it into the Guinness book,” he reflected. “I never thought I’d get a record, but it’s always been a secret, bucket list kind of thing. And now I have the official certificate hanging in my office!”

          The Sunnydale-based engineer-inventor-entrepreneur long has engaged in science for both fun and profit. The driving force behind both a Science Channel show (“The Quick And The Curious”) and a set of more than 50 engaging and educational YouTube videos with more than 300 million views and over 2 million subscribers. Rober has also worked at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), given a TED talk, contributed articles to Men’s Health and created and sold a successful digital costume company. What’s more, he regularly appears on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”

            After earning engineering degrees from BYU and USC, he joined JPL in 2004 and worked for seven years on the Curiosity car-sized robotic rover, which landed on Mars’ Gale Crater in 2012. Today the Curiosity continues its investigation of the red planet’s habitability, studying its climate and geology in preparation for a future manned mission. While at JPL, Rober also designed and delivered hardware on GRAIL (gravitational field mapping of the moon to determine its interior structure) and SMAP (an Earth observation satellite measuring soil moisture to enhance flood and drought prediction, weather forecasting and more), and was part of the team that built "JPL Wired," a comprehensive knowledge capture wiki for use within the organization.

              In October of 2011, Rober’s first YouTube video, a decidedly high-tech Halloween costume, hit the news and went viral, drawing 1.5 million views in only one day. (This “gaping hole in torso” getup was made by duct taping two iPads…one to his chest and one to his back…and linking the two using FaceTime video chat to create the illusion of seeing right through his body.)

                The public’s enthusiastic reception to this costume led Rober to patent the integration of apps with clothing and costumes, and in 2012 to launch the online shop Digital Dudz in his spare time. His costumes quickly sparked interest on TV shows including “CBS News,” ” The Jay Leno Show,” “The Today Show” and “Good Morning America,” and with advertising done only on YouTube, Digital Dudz earned a quarter million dollars in just its first three weeks.

                  By 2013, Rober’s costumes were being carried in hundreds of Party City and other specialty shops across the country. He sold Digital Dudz that year to British costume-maker Morphsuits, and left his job at NASA to join the company as chief creative officer. He later signed a deal with Disney to create augmented outfits modeled on Marvel Comics superheroes.

                    Rober’s fun-loving YouTube career has blossomed since 2013, with more than 50 engaging entries. His creative popular science and do-it-yourself gadget ideas range from April Fools'Day pranks to moving dart boards that create bullseyes, snow ball machine guns made from leaf blowers and even improvements on science fair projects like the lowly egg drop (having come a long way from his first egg drop contest in BOHS honors physics). To date, the video of his record-breaking Guinness Nerf gun has received more than 19 million views.

                      "I love to take something commonplace and reuse it in ridiculous and original ways," Rober said. His 2 million YouTube subscribers are certainly glad that he does.Catch him online at youtube.com/c/MarkRober.

                        Any news? Give Susan Gaede a jingle (714)529-8561 or email me her at suzgaede@aol.com.

  • Brea: Landmark in a centennial story told by Author Teresa Hampson

    5 months ago by

    Brea Landmarks List - Brea Boulevard North/Central


      Brea Grammar School before transitioning to Brea Junior High. Courtesy of JoAnn Penn Haws

      In the spirit of the "BJH Bobcats" photos courtesy of BOHS incoming junior, Jennifer Choi.


        Brea Junior High, 400 N. Brea Blvd…The front building dates from 1916, but its original second-story auditorium and decorative exterior trim were removed after the 1933 Long Beach Earthquake. It was substantially modernized in 2006, including relocation of the main entrance from west to north. The auditorium, PE and non-modular classroom wings were added in 1949. It served as Brea Grammar School until 1956, when it was transitioned to a junior high with the opening of Arovista.
  • Drowning is preventable; someone must take watch

    5 months ago by

    This has been one extra-hot summer, and a dip in the pool sounds great. It can be, especially for the kids, but swimming and playing in the pool can also turn tragic in seconds. So far this summer, we’ve had no drowning incidents in Brea, according the Orange County Fire Authority. But countywide, there have been 22 water-related incidents, including eight in swimming pools, six in the ocean or bay and seven in bathtubs.


      Where there is water, there is the possibility of a drowning. I know that sounds harsh, but an infant or child can drown in a few inches of water.

        It is so preventable with thoughtful caution.

          With swimming pools, if there are kids in the pool, you need a responsible adult, who can swim, to be the water watcher.

            The water watch must do just that. Watch the water and do nothing else. No checking emails or texting, but have a phone handy in case of an emergency. No chatting with someone who “just wants to keep you company.” And no drinking anything stronger than iced tea.

              Water watchers must be willing to do nothing but watch the kids and adults in the pool. It only takes seconds for a young child to go under and drown.

                Brea used to have Water Watcher tags, but you can make your own for the water watcher to hang around his neck. A good reminder of his duty.

                  Last week at the Brea Plunge. a young child had a medical incident in the pool during free swimming time. A lifeguard was on duty. The child was immediately pulled out of the pool, according to Assistant City Manager Chris Emeterio, who said the Brea Fire Department first responders were there moments later. Said Fire Chief Wolfgang Knabe, “Because of quick action by all concerned, there was a happy ending.”

                    If you own a pool or spa, you should make pool safety a priority by having the pool or spa fenced in and self-closing with a latch beyond a child’s reach. According the OCFA, alarms and pool covers are no substitutes for an at least 4-foot-high fence that junior can’t climb over. A responsible pool owner keeps a life preserver, shepherd’s hook and CPR instruction within easy reach. And, of course you should know CPR and first aid.

                      If not, there are classes available through the American Red Cross and other local sources.

                        When the baby or a child is suddenly missing, make the pool or spa the first, not the last, place you look. That is something to emphasize to your child’s caretaker or baby sitter.

                          Pool safety is also important for the elderly. And no one, regardless of age and swimming ability should ever swim alone. Swim with the family; you’ll have more fun.

                            Check out ocgov.com for more pool safety information, or stop by National Night Out from 4 to 7 p.m. on Aug. 1 at the Brea Marketplace. Bring the kids to meet Brea’s police and fire personnel, the SWAT team and K-9 units. There will be finger painting, face painting, free food, safety information and giveaways.

                              Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. She gives her perspective on Brea issues twice a month. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink. net.

  • Olinda Elementary students named state champions for National History Day

    7 months ago by

    After taking first-place ribbons at the National History Day Orange County Competition on March 11, five fifth-graders from Olinda Elementary School advanced to the state's National History Day Competition on May 6.


      Brea students at the state History Day Competition are, from left, Zoe Panis, Jiya Patel, Erika Yang, Jocelyn Islas and Sean Cronin. Their teacher, Jill Berrner, is standing behind first-place winners, Jocelyn and Sean.


        One nation's largest state History day competitions, California has more than 1,200 participants each spring.

          Sean Cronin and Jocelyn Islas took first place for individual projects. Sean's was "Claus von Stauffenberg's Stand Against the Nazi Regime," and Jocelyn's was "Harriet Tubman: Taking a Stand for Freedom."

            Quite an honor for Brea and Orange County!

              Susan Gaede has cast her eye on local news for more than 40 years. Contact her at 714-529-8561 or email her at suzgaede@aol.com.

  • City of Brea Centennial Kick-Off Celebration

    7 months ago by

    Drum roll, Please!


      4 Days and Counting!

        Celebrate Brea's centennial kickoff parade and picnic this Saturday, May 20 at 9:00 a.m.


          Historic iconic Charlie’s Clock aka Charlie the Clock is ticking in countdown of the City of Brea’s centennial kickoff parade and picnic this Saturday, May 20 at 9:00 a.m.

            The parade will feature over 100 entries including USC Trojan Marching Band, the 501st Legion/Southern California Garrison Star Wars Group, BOHS Ladycat sport stars, local youth and sport groups, Brea police and fire departments, Soroptimist International of Brea/La Habra, and much more!!

              Andrea Barber, actor known for Full House, Fuller House, and Days of Our Lives, along with former Major League legendary pitchers, Randy Jones and Charlie Hough, will be the grand marshals for the parade! All three special guests share a connection with the City of Brea.

                Free parking is available, courtesy of Beckman Coulter, at the southeast corner of Birch and Kraemer. Street closures in the area begin at 7:00 a.m. on the centennial parade and picnic day.
  • Excerpt from Charlie the Rockin’ Clock in Brea History’s Biggest Hits!

    7 months ago by

    Brea’s first children’s book, a centennial celebration, named Charlie the Rockin' Clock in Brea History's Biggest Hits!


      Excerpt from chapter three: ONE HECK of a DECADE

        Author, Teresa Hampson

          Illustration by 2006 BOHS grad and recent CSUF grad, Heather Ashlyn Collins

            The Brea Bowl held on Halloween in 1924 between Brea's baseball hero, Walter Johnson, aka “The Big Train” and his friend baseball player, Babe Ruth, aka “The Sultan of Swing.
            Book characters from left to right: Jesse, Skyler, Jarred, Charlie the Clock, Roman, Madison and Lauren.


              "Stop the clock!” gasped Roman. “What are Walter Johnson and Babe Ruth doing here?”

                "Crazy, isn’t it?” Charlie agreed. “But the answer’s really simple. Walter Johnson grew up in Olinda, where everyone adored baseball and every oil company fielded a team, and his very first pitching experience came during his years there. Major league players often went on tour during the off season in these days, so when Johnson came back to Brea, it was natural for him to bring along some friends for a charity baseball game!”

                  As Charlie spoke, the game got underway, and Ruth, who normally played outfield, stepped in as his team’s pitcher. Most in the crowd started out rooting for Johnson, their hometown son, but Ruth’s batting talent caused quite a few to switch sides. One wonderful inning followed another, and then Ruth again stepped up to the plate.

                    "I can’t believe I’m seeing Babe Ruth play!” shrieked Jesse, a big baseball fan. And just as he said it, an enormous roar rose from the field.

                      “Look at it go!” shouted Skyler, pointing to a ball barreling way out into the field… When that huge home run finally touched down, thrilled officials measured it a 550-foot grand slam – ample reason for naming Ruth the day’s most valuable player.

                        "It looks like Walter Johnson’s team is losing, but nobody seems to mind,” Madison observed a little while later.

                          She was right. The fortunate fans who saw Johnson and Ruth face off that autumn afternoon seldom spoke of (or even seemed to recall) what the final score was, but always considered themselves blessed to be there for Brea’s great day in baseball.

                            "Charlie, that was the BEST afternoon ever!!!!!” Jesse exclaimed as the post-game photo session wrapped up. “You really outdid yourself this time!”

                              “Oh, I have my moments,” Charlie beamed. “But right now – we’ve gotta fly!”

  • Brea’s former mayors set the pace for our future

    8 months ago by

    Did you know Brea has 14 living former mayors, all appointed by their peers, 10 who still live in Brea?


      They have presided over Brea during different eras and often under challenging conditions, but I am only highlighting former mayors not currently on council.

        Mayor Lynn Daucher is seen in this 1998 photo at the helm of a bulldozer for the groundbreaking of Brea Downtown. (Courtesy of Lynn Daucher)


          Our living former mayors date back to 1964, when then 28-year-old Thomas Speers was appointed mayor for a two-year term. Speers now lives in Colorado, and recalled how he and his council were successful in changing the position of city administrator to a full-time city manager and other professional staffing needed for a growing city.

            During Rex Gaede’s turn as mayor in 1977, he was instrumental in changing the mayoral term from two years to one year so more council members could serve in the center seat. Gaede’s most memorable mayor moment was presiding over the opening of the Brea Mall, a very big deal for the community.

              Ron Isles, who now lives in Arkansas, served on the council two times, and as mayor in 1982 and again in 1992. He said he worked with the city manager and finance manager to set minimum budget constraints to assure that Brea would always have money and be able to pay its bills. That seems to still be the case today.

                A big change came in 1984 when Norma Arias Hicks Buckeye, now of Fallbrook, was appointed mayor. She was the first woman and first Hispanic to be elected to Brea’s City Council. She was instrumental in getting Sacramento bigwigs to create Chino Hills State Park, and also fought the landfill expansion.

                  Carrey Nelson, our oldest living mayor at age 90, served as mayor in 1984 and 1990. He served 14 years on council, and the downtown’s huge transformation came under his watch.

                    Mayor in 1990, Wayne Wedin said working with a strong team of staff, council and the community was successful as was developing a strong relationship with the school district. He was also instrumental in starting Brea’s Art in Public Places.

                      Burnie Dunlap became mayor in 1992, 1993 and 1996. A highlight of being mayor was the completion of the Brea Community Center. He now lives in Anaheim Hills, but says he still loves Brea!

                        Bev Perry, mayor in 1995, 2000 and 2003, became mayor in 1995 and the next day Orange County declared bankruptcy. She spent much of that year in meetings with other O.C. cities who also had money invested with the county. In the end, she said, they were able to craft a deal that returned nearly all of Brea’s money back to the city.

                          Lynn Daucher, mayor 1997-98, said her most memorable mayor moment was at the downtown groundbreaking in October 1998. She said it was culmination of years of hard work by several city councils, but the best part was Daucher at the controls of the bulldozer. Something I doubt she has repeated.

                            John Beauman, mayor in 2004 and 2009, especially enjoyed commemorating the Brea Sports Park opening in 2008, and also serving as president of the Orange County Division of the League of California Cities.

                              Former police chief Bill Lentini was mayor in 2004. His goal on council was to help bring civility back to our local government and finally make the sports park a reality. During his mayoral year, he saw the revitalization of South Brea Boulevard and safeguards set for the hillsides.

                                Don Schweitzer was mayor in 2008 and 2012, following in the mayoral footsteps from the past of his father and grandfather. His favorite accomplishment as mayor was presenting the idea of a Brea war memorial, getting it funded and finally built.

                                  Ron Garcia served as Brea’s mayor in 2006. Unfortunately he did not respond to my requests.

                                    Brett Murdock served as Brea’s mayor in 2014 and worked hard on the Lagos de Moreno Park rehabilitation project at Laurel School. “It will be an incredible addition to our great city and school district,” he said.

                                      Murdock is the only former mayor who stated he is seriously considering running again for office. Which one? He didn’t say.

                                        Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. She gives her perspective on Brea issues twice a month. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net.

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