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Anabel King

  • 2016 BBON Certificate of Excellence: Choha Kim and Anabel King

    12 months ago by

    Logo_Brea-Centennial_LOGO-1


      October 30, 2016

        Beautiful Brea Old & New (BBON) is proud to award a certificate of excellence in the area of journalism and academics to Brea Olinda High School (BOHS) senior students and BBON team members, Choha Kim and Anabel King for their contribution in the area of journalism and academics on BBON. For the past two years, both Kim and King have contributed noteworthy community online news articles of interest focusing primarily on BOHS. We applaud Kim and King for a job well done and look forward to their stories and engaging posts on social media in the weeks and months ahead as we countdown to our centennial celebration.

  • California is the first state to teach LGBT history in schools

    1 year ago by

    With a unanimous vote by the California State Board of Education in July, California public schools will now teach LGBT history. The State Board will implement a 2011 state law signed by Gov. Jerry Brown which requires schools to include LGBT history as early as second grade. This decision will make California the first state in the nation to teach LGBT history in school textbooks.


      According to Peter Tira, information officer for the California Department of Education, the policy will go into effect immediately across California elementary, middle, and high school history classes, in time for the 2016-2017 school year. Tira also adds that there is a 2017 deadline for school textbooks to include LGBT content.

        At BOHS, the Social Science Department has not developed new plans as of yet to implement the new curriculum, according to Matt Rainwater, department head. However, Rainwater, along with fellow history teacher, Brian Schlueter, already include LGBT history as part of their civil rights unit, as both believe inclusion of the LGBT community is essential to teaching American history. Regarding the deadline, Rainwater notes that a majority of current history textbooks at BOHS are “almost as old as the students who study them” as many date back to 2002.

          However, at lower schools, such inclusion is not as. According to Trish Walsh, Country Hills Elementary School principal, the school currently teaches the curriculum adopted by the BOUSD School Board of Education, but no plans have been made to adopt new social studies textbooks as of yet.

            “Our students will enter college classrooms and the workplace in the next few years and they’re going to come across people of many different backgrounds. To assume that a place of higher education or any workplace is purely a heterosexual workplace would be very wrong. We have not just people of different ethnic backgrounds, but people of different gender identities and sexualities amongst us. And to pretend that they don’t exist is not just doing a disservice to them but a disservice to them as global citizens,” Eugene Lee, history teacher, said.

              From second grade, students will learn about diverse family structures, such as families with LGBT parents, to help students “locate themselves and their own families in history and learn about the lives and historical struggles of their peers,” according to the text of the framework.

                The BOHS Gay-Straight Alliance Club president Alisa Fang, junior, believes this addition is a huge step for the LGBT community. “For California to implement LGBTQ history into school textbooks is...amazing, for lack of a better word. LGBT youth are more likely to suffer bullying in school, suffer from depression, and commit suicide. This is not okay. People are substituting something as innocent and pure as love with hate and intolerance. I hope that with the aid of LGBTQ history into schools, this vicious cycle can be broken. By including LGBTQ history in our history books, we are not only acknowledging the sacrifices made, but we are also changing the perspective of future generations to a more open-minded one (hopefully).”

                  Tom Torlakson, California Superintendent of Public Instruction, believes that the inclusion of LGBT history is “a big win for our students.” “This document will improve the teaching and learning of history and social science. It will give our students access to the latest historical research and help them learn about the diversity of our state and the contributions of people and groups who may not have received the appropriate recognition in the past,” Torlakson said.

                    Critics of the state decision, such as the National Association of Scholars and Breitbart News, believe the ruling is “absurd” and “the height of political correctness”. But others applaud the move, noting that this furthers California’s history of progressivism.

                      “This is a small world, this is an ephemeral life, a temporary life we live,” Lee said. “And for us to exclude people based on their gender identity is not only wrong -- it’s going to push us behind. There are many [LGBT] people who serve in the military, who are in the entertainment industry, who are teachers, who are students, and they all deserve a voice. And I think California as a progressive state is doing an outstanding job leading the nation once again in what a progressive state looks like.”

                        Author: Anabel King

                          Anabel King is a student reporter for Beautiful Brea Old and New. You can contact this writer at anabelking7@gmail.com.

  • Brea sets up cooling stations during heat wave

    1 year ago by

    As the heat wave continues, power outages strike Orange County, including Brea, where 1,600 homes went without power. Photo source: http://s4.reutersmedia.net/

    As the heat wave continues, power outages strike Orange County, including Brea, where 1,600 homes went without power. Photo source: http://s4.reutersmedia.net/

    As the heat wave sweeps across Southern California, a power outage struck 1,600 Brea homes earlier this week, along with hundreds of other homes across Orange County. As a result, Southern California Edison officials issued a Flex Alert, calling for residents to limit their electricity usage.

      A flex alert is a voluntary conservation of energy, which promotes actions such as turning off unnecessary lights, postponing use of major appliances and keeping thermostats at 78 degrees and higher.

        For those without AC, the city of Brea has set up cooling stations at the Brea Community Center, the Brea Senior Center, the Brea Branch Library, and the Brea Mall.

          According to city officials, Brea residents can take up safety and health precautions by staying hydrated, wearing loose clothing, staying out of the sun or wearing sunhats and sunscreen, and avoiding heavy activity in a non-air conditioned environment. City officials also remind residents to never leave children, elderly people, or pets unattended in closed cars.

            Other outages reported by SC Edison occured in Studio City (1,200 homes), West Covina (1,015 homes), and Mission Viejo (81).

  • BOHS officer Dan Moon to retire after 16 years of service

    1 year ago by


      Campus officer Dan Moon will retire after 16 years at BOHS. (photo source: wikimedia.org)

      Campus officer Dan Moon will retire after 16 years at BOHS. (photo source: wikimedia.org)

      A fter 16 years of service, Dan Moon, police officer, will retire as the BOHS campus officer at the end of this year.

        “I’m going to miss the day-to-day fun of getting to work with [the students] and getting to participate in school activities. It has been a tremendous blessing for me to be in this position and to be able to do it for 16 years and to know all the people that I’ve gotten to know and to see all the kids that I’ve been able to see progressing through the years,” Moon said.

          Moon graduated from Cal State Fullerton in 1983 where he earned his teaching credential. He then became a student teacher at BOHS, and eventually an academic teacher and coach for swimming and water polo. However, when the campus relocated from the Brea Marketplace, many teachers were forced to find another job, and Moon was assigned to BOHS by the Brea Police Department to curtail and stop drug use.

            “When you think of what the term a ‘school resource officer’ is, Moon really fits the bill. He worked with us in a direction that ensured we did not do anything to violate anybody's rights. Moon was always there as a safeguard, and he was always an extra set of eyes by keeping us updated with the pulse of the community,” Jerry Halpin, principal, said.

              In the future, with his Master’s Degree in Christian Theology and Doctrine from Talbot Seminary in Biola University, Moon plans to apply to Orange Luther to lead theology classes. As for his family, Moon is excited to visit his four children who are scattered across the world as well as possibly move to Colorado.

  • BOHS students participate in California primary

    1 year ago by

    An increasing amount of young people participated in the California primary, even some from Brea Olinda High School.

    An increasing amount of young people participated in the California primary, even some from Brea Olinda High School.

    Over a dozen students from Brea Olinda High School volunteered as a student poll worker for the California primary on Tuesday, many of them too young to vote. And while the California primary witnessed many surprising (and some not-so-surprising) results on Tuesday, an increased participation among the youth demographic this year follows a growing national trend.

      “I wanted to volunteer because I finally started to pay attention to politics this year,” Rianne Paracuelles, junior, said. “Even though I can’t vote, I still wanted to fulfill my civic duty by helping out. Also I learned a lot about how official the process is and how important it is that every single person votes because it really does matter.”

        BOHS student poll workers were placed all over Orange County, arriving at their assigned poll location at 6 a.m. and ending as late as 10 p.m. All poll workers are required to undergo a training session where they learn how to process voters, how to set up their location site, and how to prepare for various scenarios. At the training, volunteers were told to expect a high voter turnout this year, considering the high election turnouts across the country. In addition, poll workers learned how to set up the electronic voting booths, as Orange County is one of the two counties in California that is allowed to use them.

          “It was a really cool experience. My team worked around a 15-hour day, so it was definitely exhausting, but I got to learn a ton about what kind of things constitute a voting day,” Hannah Towbin, junior, said. “So many different kinds of people came out to vote, which I thought represented our modern American culture, and each person for the most part was really nice. We had a couple of frustrating ones though, like a man who showed up with a Bernie shirt on. Unfortunately we had to ask him to come back with a new shirt because it’s policy that he couldn’t represent any one person or party, but everything else went really smoothly.”

            Prior to the primary, many students and teachers at BOHS took part in electioneering on campus. History teacher Eugene Lee was known for his advocacy of presidential candidate Bernie Sanders and decorated his room with campaign buttons and posters. History teacher Jeff Sink regularly discussed the election in his classes, educating his students on not only the political issues and candidates, but the political process as well, such as the difference between a primary and a caucus or the purpose of superdelegates. Some students went to campaign rallies, such as in April, when a group of students took off during a school day to attend a Bernie Sanders rally in Los Angeles. The group was invited to stand behind the senator, and at one point, senior Kyle Kirk fainted during the rally.

              And in early May, workers from the Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders campaign came to BOHS during a lunch period one day, encouraging eligible students to register to vote and recruiting volunteers for the campaign. During the California primary, the high voter turnout matched the 2008 election turnout as early as 10 a.m., according to Neal Kelley, the Orange County Registrar of Voters. And from there, voter turnout continued to increase among all demographics.

                “Working at a polling place was definitely worth doing despite the long hours. Seeing how voting works today will make me a more well-educated voter in the future, I hope,” Towbin said.

  • City of Brea Centennial Steering Committee

    2 years ago by

    Group photo of the Brea Centennial Steering Committee.  Top Row: Tim Harvey-historical society, Isaiah Emaguna-youth rep., Pastor Rick Dardin-ministerial association, Anabel King-youth rep., Chris Emeterio-city empl., Chris Reimer-city empl., Wayne Wedin-past city council, Terry Halcom-member at large, Cindy Ryan-city empl., John Bickel-historical society, Barbara Ott-school district, P.J. Smith-Lions club, Joanne Todd-senior center, Mayor Christine Marick, Sean Matlock-city empl., Heidi Gallegos-chamber, Liz Pharis-city empl., and Bill Higgins-Rotary club. Bottom row: Denise Terrazas-member at large, Bev Perry-past city council, Keith Fullington-member at large, Wendi Gensel-city empl., Mayor Pro Tem Cecilia Hupp, Carrie Hernandez-city empl., Pat Treymayne-city empl., Amber Ahlo-city empl., and Carolyn Campbell-member at large. Missing: Holli Kittleson-city empl. and Coley Fisher-member at large.

    Group photo of the Brea Centennial Steering Committee.
    Top Row from left to right: Tim Harvey-historical society, Isaiah Emaguna-youth rep., Pastor Rick Dardin-ministerial association, Anabel King-youth rep., Chris Emeterio-city empl., Chris Reimer-city empl., Wayne Wedin-past city council, Terry Halcom-member at large,
    Cindie Ryan-city empl., John Bickel-historical society, Barbara Ott-school district, P.J. Smith-Lions club, Joanne Todd-senior center, Mayor Christine Marick, Sean L. Matlock-city empl., Heidi Gallegos-chamber, Liz Pharis-city empl., and Bill Higgins-Rotary club.
    Bottom row from left to right: Denise Terrazas-member at large, Bev Perry-past city council, Keith Fullington-member at large, Wendi Gensel-city empl., Mayor Pro Tem Cecilia Hupp, Carrie Hernandez-city empl., Pat Tremayne-city empl., Amber Ahlo-city empl., and Carolyn Campbell-member at large. Not shown: Holli Kittleson-city empl. and Coley Fisher-member at large.


      Last evening was our first of many meetings to come in planning Brea’s centennial celebration 2017! The group is comprised of nine city employees and 20 community members. Twenty-seven were present last evening at the Brea Community Center.

        The green t-shirt that former Mayor Bev Perry is holding up in the photo dates back to Brea’s Jubilee Parade in celebration of Brea’s 75-year anniversary. Longtime Brean and Assistant City Manager/Community Services Director, Chris Emeterio, actually wore it on that special day.

          The meeting was two hours long, with the last hour spent brainstorming.

            We have an amazing group of enthusiastic people. The journey has just begun and there were so many creative ideas!

              We'll take you along the way in keeping you informed as decisions are made and let you know when we need your help. Because after all, this is a once-in-a-lifetime-event!

  • Hoverboards: how and where to ride them in Brea

    2 years ago by

    A new California bill allows hoverboards in public, but with certain safety and traffic requirements. (photo source: yahoo.com)

    It was the must-have holiday item of 2015, yet it was banned almost everywhere from Great Britain and New York to individual stores and malls. It was on the top of every kid’s (or adult’s) wishlist, yet large companies like Amazon and Target stopped selling them. It was the hottest, new tech fad costing up to $1,000, yet there were dozens of reports of it catching on fire. And now, as of Jan. 1, it’s legal to ride them in the state of California.

      Known as hoverboards, these self-balancing electric boards are the latest gadget craze coveted by children and adults alike. And according to a new California bill effective Jan. 1, all motorized wheeled devices, including hoverboards, can be used anywhere bicycles are allowed to go to accommodate commuters in bicycle and car traffic. The new law requires some regulations, however, such as an age requirement of 16 years old and the wearing of a helmet and any other safety gear while riding.

        Although the law legalized hoverboard use in public, it allows local governments to regulate the motorizing board, giving communities the right to ban them or penalize them as they choose. In the city of Brea, there are no specific regulations regarding hoverboards as of yet, but they will be treated the same way as skateboards until further city rules are made, according to Brea Traffic Sergeant Tim Mercado.

          Although there are no safety requirements imposed by Brea law enforcement, Mercado strongly recommends that younger hoverboard riders wear a helmet and elbow/knee pads, while avoiding conflict with vehicular traffic.

            “As with any new toy or vehicle that children operate, I believe good old common sense should be the dominating theme when these devices are operated anywhere in regard to safety equipment. There will likely be push-back from whatever safety equipment we as parents will suggest to our children, but safety should always be the first consideration,” Mercado said.

              The new bill overturns the previous law in 1977 which prohibited motorized skateboards, mostly because of their gas emissions, a feature that does not apply to most modern electric boards today.

                But with the new law, hoverboard owners are free to skate in public as long as they meet the safety and traffic requirements.

  • BOHS’ Model United Nations club competes at the UCLA MUN conference

    2 years ago by

    photo source: bruinmun.org BOHS MUN members will compete at the UCLA MUN conference.

    photo source: bruinmun.org
    BOHS MUN members will compete at the UCLA MUN conference.

    Brea Olinda High School’s Model United Nations club will attend the 23rd Bruin Model United Nations conference at UCLA today and tomorrow, competing against other high school students from all around the world. BOHS will be sending delegates Charlotte Kim, Stacy Uhm, Jane Lee, and Ashley Kim to represent the country of Vietnam along with club advisors Eugene Lee and Amanda Hefner.

      Junior Jane Lee and sophomore Ashley Kim, both club co-presidents, will compete as one of the four Crisis committees, a level typically designed for seasoned delegates who apply their knowledge of history and critical thinking skills.

        “I’m excited to attend the conference, but I’m also nervous because I have no idea what to expect at such a big conference,” Lee said.

          Juniors Charlotte Kim and Stacy Uhm, the latter joining the team this year, will compete at the beginner level committee, which are smaller in size and designed for novice delegates.

            “I’m really excited to go to the conference this year. I think it’s a great opportunity, especially since it’s at UCLA, and I’m so grateful to get the chance to be a part of it,” Uhm said. The students have been preparing for the conference by working on their position paper and researching about Vietnam. They have also rehearsed their opening speech for the conference, a speech that they must present under one minute.

              This is the first time that the BOHS Model United Nations club has attended the UCLA conference, last competing in two small conferences in 2013. In 2013, the club won several awards in the past, such as Best Delegate, Outstanding Delegate, and Commendations. Last year, however, the club did not compete in a conference, mostly due to lack of interest.

                This year the club hopes to win awards again and relies on the team’s hard work and dedication to get them through the conference.

                  “My goal is for all of us to win awards at the end of the year, and I’m confident that we will,” Lee said.

  • BOHS installs new safety measure for classrooms

    2 years ago by

    Brea Olinda High School recently installed Lock Bloks on classroom doors, a safety measure that will protect students and staff from dangerous threats, such as intruders, on campus.


      The Lock Bloks device enables the user to lock the door from the inside, requiring the teacher to keep the classroom door locked on the outside at all times. The door remains open throughout the day due to the Lock Blok’s retractable feature that prevents the door from shutting all the way. But the device can also quickly allow the user to dismantle the door-prevention feature in the event of a dangerous situation that would require a locked door.

        The Brea Olinda High School installs Lock Bloks on all classrooms, a device that will help with campus safety

        The Brea Olinda High School installs Lock Bloks on all classrooms, a device that will help with campus safety

        “Anything [we] can do to give [ourselves] a few more seconds in the case of an emergency will come in handy,” Bob Parish, BOHS Assistant Principal, said. “It’s a simple process to set it up in the door, so having the Lock Blok’s will come to great use if ever in an emergency situation. And though we wish to never have to use the Lock Blok’s, we truly believe that if ever in an emergency, they will come to great use and protect our student body”.

          In the past years, BOHS has had to use metal pieces to slide under the hallway doors to protect against intruders. But according to Parish, these metal pieces presented several safety concerns, such as the time it takes to set up the metal pieces and the fact that a person would have to go outside to lock the door and would be unable to come back inside.

            “I think the new Lock Bloks features are amazing in terms of campus safety,” Nadia Fox, French teacher and school safety advocate, said. “It’s definitely more reassuring as a teacher to have this safety measure for my students.”

  • BOHS Homecoming Dance was a “A Night to Remember”

    2 years ago by

    Students donned in corsages and boutonnieres prepare for #Homecoming2015

    Students donned in corsages and boutonnieres prepare for #Homecoming2015

    The BOHS Homecoming Dance kicked off last night at the Balboa Pavilion in Newport Beach. With the theme “A Night to Treasure,” students were free to bust some moves at the dance floor, relax on an evening boat tour aboard the Balboa riverboat, and enjoy the rest of the night at the beach’s Fun Zone where they could ride the ferris wheel, the bungee assisted trampoline ride, and even play in some arcades.

      Once again, the Dance was hosted by the BOHS Girls’ League, who worked hard to organize the event. And all their hard work paid off as the students were buzzing with excitement throughout the night.

        “This year’s dance definitely had that carnival-vibe to it,” Amaris Salas, junior, said. “I think that’s part of what made it so fun--there was just so many things to do and I wanted to do them all!”

          The BOHS Homecoming Dance was held at the Balboa Pavilion in Newport Beach. Photo credit: balboapavilion.com

          The BOHS Homecoming Dance was held at the Balboa Pavilion in Newport Beach. Photo credit: balboapavilion.com

          The night before the dance, the senior Homecoming queen was announced at the BOHS Homecoming football game. Libby Williams, senior, took home the crown, along with the other Homecoming princesses, junior Hannah Towbin, sophomore Jennie Pendergast, and freshman Amanda Acaba.

            All in all, the BOHS Homecoming Dance of 2015 seemed to be a “true success” and it was definitely “A Night to Treasure.”

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