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Brea City Council

  • Terri’s Town: Community needs to talk about need for environmental board

    2 years ago by

    BY TERRI DAXON / CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST


      In February after a presentation on oil operations given by a group of Brea citizens that included Rick Clark, Susan Fujioka, Ann Marshall, Jennifer Hefner and Christie Russell, plus environmental experts, those Brea citizens asked the City Council to consider forming a citizens’ environmental advisory board. Their concerns were mainly about hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, for extracting oil and gas from the oil fields surrounding Brea.

        Since then, the group has held meetings with Brea’s civic leaders and staff and asked for a public hearing be held at a City Council meeting or elsewhere regarding the possibility of forming a Brea environmental advisory board that would address environmental issues beyond those in the oil fields.

          The city staff checked which Orange County and other California cities had environmental advisory boards or committees.

            What they found was that 10 O.C. cities have some type of environmental board or committee. They also found that several cities up and down the state have environmental committees, but do we need one in Brea?

              I did my own research (thank you, Google) and found the boards and committees vary in their environmental focus. For instance, Irvine’s Green Ribbon Environmental Committee recently discussed paper shredding events, recycling Christmas trees and promoting the use of LED holiday lights.

                No real surprise that San Clemente’s environmental group is the Coastal Advisory Committee, while Santa Ana has an Environmental and Transportation Advisory Committee. Laguna Woods gets the prize for longest name for its environmental group: Hazard Mitigation and Climate Change Committee.

                  “Fullerton’s Energy and Resource Management Committee” said City Manager Joe Felz, “provides policy recommendations to the City Council on a variety of energy and resource issues.” He added that two years ago the committee also became an appeals board for residents’ appealing water bill issues. “This has been very successful,” said Felz.

                    Since it was folks concerned about fracking that approached the City Council about establishing an environmental advisory board, would that be their only emphasis?

                      “No,” said Clark, who is also a Brea planning commissioner. “An EAB would be a portal for focused study and understanding of environmental issues…keep council apprised of local successes and growing environmental and legislative risks.”

                        Fujioka, although a real watchdog and self-made expert on oil and gas operations and state regulations, emphasized that oil operations are just one aspect of the bigger environmental puzzle the board would address.

                          We already have the Hills for Everyone environmental group in the area, but according to Claire Schlotterbeck, its executive director, “Our interest is land conservation and all of the co-benefits that come from that (including) reduced traffic, reduced pollution, reduced water use and increased quality of life.”

                            There certainly could be some overlap between the two groups, but since Hills does not address oil and gas operations there is no overlap in that area.

                              The only way to find out if an environmental advisory board is right for Brea is for there to be a public discussion on the advantages and possible stumbling blocks from establishing and maintaining such a board.

                                Sound good to you? If so, let our City Council members know.

                                  Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net. http://www.ocregister.com/articles/environmental-690525-board-brea.html

  • Money from landfill affects to help pay for parking structure

    2 years ago by

    Once the City Council finally determined Brea needed to build a third parking structure in the downtown, the next step was to find some $10 million to build it. They didn’t search much farther than the landfill mitigation money for a big chunk of it.


      In 2009, the county of Orange, which owns and operates the Olinda Alpha Landfill, made a deal with Brea to pay the city $10.5 million in mitigation fees for the privilege of extending the life and breadth of the landfill until 2021, when the landfill is estimated to reach capacity.

        Those fees, according to Brea City Manager Bill Gallardo, include $1.50 per ton of refuse deposited in the landfill and paid quarterly to the city. The current balance is approximately $5.2 million.

          The mitigation fees are to compensate for the daily assault of truck traffic, noise, odors, air quality and other environmental impacts. Many of us were led to believe preservation of open space was included.

            Gallardo said the landfill agreement gives the city discretion in use of the funds. He pointed out that the document states…”capital mitigation funds can be used for implementation of measures designed to mitigate impacts…. including, but not limited to traffic, noise, aesthetics and open space preservation.”

              It is that “not limited to” that opened the door to scooping into the pot for projects such as solar bond payments of $1.4 million. Gallardo said that during the Great Recession the landfill money was tapped to pay the solar bond payments as a means of avoiding additional staff layoffs and cuts to city services.

                “The General Fund has resumed paying its share of the Solar Bond payments,” said Gallardo via email, adding that “at this time there is no reimbursement planned” for the landfill money used.

                  In 2012, the state ended redevelopment agencies originally used to combat blight in cities, and eventually took Brea’s redevelopment bonds of about $5.6 million. Our city leaders scrambled to find more money for pending and future redevelopment projects, maybe like the goofy-looking sunshades on the corners at Birch Street and Brea Boulevard.

                    Come 2014, our city leaders got the big idea of separating that $1.50 tonnage fee from the rest of the mitigation fees and naming it the Community Benefit and Economic Development Fund. This was to help compensate for the loss of redevelopment funds and the continuation of so-called legacy community projects plus attracting and retaining business and economic development.

                      “It will have approximately $3.4 million in it by the end of this fiscal year, “ said David Crabtree, Brea’s community development deputy director. It is expected to increase by $1.3 million by next year.

                        The hefty balance and growth of the new fund seemed to give the council the push they needed to soon dip into it to the tune of $4.7 million to help pay for the new parking structure. And the balance? The state has released about $5.6 million in redevelopment bonds and they are also earmarked by council for the parking structure.

                          Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net.

  • With lots of talk, council chooses parking structure plan

    2 years ago by

    After nearly three hours at the Aug. 18 council meeting, the Brea City Council finally made some decisions on the prospects of a parking structure behind the Tower building in Brea Downtown.


      While some past councils barely spoke to one another on and off the dais, these folks discuss every issue into oblivion. I thought it might be a short meeting. I was very wrong.

        The question was simply should they vote for building a parking structure for the eastside of Brea Boulevard, and should it be for parking only or include 40 affordable housing units and offices for Jamboree Housing, the developer of such housing?

          Simple? Nope. But all five council members did agree that the mixed-use plan was too costly at nearly $19 million and would yield only eight more public parking spaces than the parking-only plan that offers 307 new parking spaces at a cost of $12.7 million or less, bringing the total available parking to 486 spaces.

            Finally, Councilmember Cecilia Hupp made a motion to approve the parking-only design option and was seconded by Councilmember Steve Vargas. But that was voted on after Councilwoman Christine Marick made a substitute motion to eliminate the mixed-use plan but not address the parking-only plan. That passed 3-2 with Mayor Marty Simonoff and Hupp dissenting. After much more discussion Hupp’s motion was passed 4-1 with Councilman Glenn Parker dissenting.

              Parker and Marick favored the mixed-use plan, but not the price tag.

                Said Marick, “Brea has a longstanding commitment to affordable housing so I am certainly open to looking at other opportunities to build affordable housing in or near the downtown.”

                  At the Sept. 22 council meeting, the funding sources are suppose to be named, and the Big Five can use their great communication skills to debate such decisions as if money should come from the 560 Fund, originally intended for hillside preservation, or if the city’s unfunded pension liability will stall the project. That doesn’t seem to be the case, according to Simonoff.

                    “There is a plan already in place to reduce pension liability,” said Simonoff, “every city (including Brea) is required to pay additional funds to reduced the liability. Plus we are looking at other methods to utilize some of our funds to reduce our liability in a manner that will speed up the process for Brea.”

                      The parking structure’s Request for Proposals from qualified builders goes out in the fall.

                        In 1999, when the downtown was just emerging, then Councilman Roy Moore pushed in vain for a parking structure behind the Tower building. In his final Brea Net e-newsletter, No. 708 published July 15, 2015, he wrote that it could have been built then for $5 million with redevelopment money and Tower would not be empty for nine years.

                          Roy passed away Aug. 19. He served 16 years on the City Council and three terms as mayor. We’ll all miss him walking around the July 4 Country Fair in his Uncle Sam hat, and him stopping to chat with one and all at Brea Fest or John’s Place.

                            Rest in peace, my friend.

                              Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net.

  • 2015 Special Olympian, Jeff Scott, wins Gold and Bronze Medal in Tennis

    2 years ago by

    Jeff Scott competed in the  Special Olympics  for the fourth time and won a gold medal in doubles and a bronze medal in singles.

    Jeff Scott competed in the Special Olympics for the fourth time and won a gold medal in doubles and a bronze medal in singles.


      As many of you heard, Brea resident, Jeff Scott, on his fourth trip to participate in the Special Olympics World Games held this year in Los Angeles, won a doubles tennis gold and a bronze medal in singles this past week! We caught up with his mother and father, Roseann and Rick Scott, who were overwhelmed with delight about his accomplishments.

        This was Jeff’s first gold medal and his mom said, that he and his partner in doubles, Bobby Williams from Missouri, just happened to graduate at Valencia High School in Placentia - Jeff’s alma mater, too. Roseann also relayed that Jeff, 46, and his partner, Bobby, 40, triumphed against much younger players who were in their late teens from Belgium. “Never say Never” as this was especially remarkable in their victory!

          Special Olympics gold medal ceremony. Left to right doubles partners in red and blue: Bobby Williams and Jeff Scott. (courtesy Roseann Scott)

          Special Olympics gold medal ceremony. Left to right doubles partners in red and blue: Bobby Williams and Jeff Scott. (courtesy Roseann Scott)


            This past weekend Jeff participated in the celebrity exhibition match promoting unified sports, non-handicapped individuals competing with special athletes. According to Roseanne, Jeff played doubles with Pete Sampras, an American known wildly as one of the greatest in tennis history. Other celebrity participants included Michael Te-Pei Chang, an American tennis player who won the Grand Slam singles in 1989 at the age of 17, and Nadia Comaneci from Russia, whose accomplishments include three Olympic gold medals in gymnastics. Celebrity actor George Lazenby, best known for portraying James Bond in a 1969 film was in attendance and hosting the celebrity event was Pam Shriver of Newport Beach, who among her credits is a doubles specialist and a current tennis broadcaster for ESPN.

              Jeff Scott sitting proudly with his parents, Rick and Roseann. (courtesy Roseann Scott)

              Jeff Scott sitting proudly with his parents, Rick and Roseann. (courtesy Roseann Scott)


                It was quite a surreal experience for the Scott family! At the awards ceremony Roseann said, “Jeff broke down and cried for each medal he got." Adding,"Rick and I are paralyzed from the last two weeks! It was an amazing experience. Having attended three of the four World Games with Jeff we found the Los Angeles site to be the best! Jeff’s entire USA Tennis delegation (coaches & athletes) plus parents and family members just “clicked!” We have never experienced such friendship and support in past Games. Jeff has made long term friends and we have found sources to keep Jeff involved in tennis for future years."

                  The City Council, upon hearing confirmation from Jeff and his parents, will be honoring him at the meeting on August 18 at 7:00 p.m.-- very befitting for our special sports hero, so try to make the date and give him a shout out for his amazing accomplishments. For those of you who can’t attend, you can watch it on Channel 3!

                    LATEST UPDATE RE: Jeff Scott's community recognition. Due to work constraints, Jeff and his parents are unable to make the City Council's evening meeting on August 18. Mayor Marty Simonoff is in the midst of scheduling a plan for an afternoon occasion to honor Jeff Scott's notable Special Olympics accomplishments.

  • Oil operations concerns raised at council meeting

    3 years ago by


      Last year Linn Energy, the oil drilling company that works the oil fields just beyond Brea’s borders, gave a presentation on the hydraulic fracturing process, or fracking, and how safe it is.

        At the last Brea City Council meeting, Mayor Marty Simonoff announced that Linn said it would find a way to notify residents of oil activity such as fracking.

          That was prior to a group of Brea residents and experts who made their own presentation to the council that night about local oil operations. They had requested the time during the meeting, Linn Energy was not invited to participate.

            They started with Rick Clark who talked about how Brea oil operations date back to 1866, and its long relationship with the oil industry.

              Ann Marshall expressed frustration with oil industry jargon, and how a slight change in a term refers to another procedure. Marshall said she was told no acidization, the injection of chemicals into the well to dissolve rock, was happening in the Brea oil fields, but found acid solutions are used for well maintenance.

                She also spoke about acid dump jobs that use more than 20,000 gallons of water plus acid solutions. She said she learned that procedure was used on the water disposal well by Olinda Elementary School.

                  Jennifer Hefner spoke about the Clean Air and Clean Water acts’ exemptions and exclusions for the oil and gas industry, and concerns that they give oil and gas extraction preference over public health, safety and environment.

                    The next speaker was Calvin Tillman, former mayor of DISH, Texas. He showed an aerial view of DISH dotted with spots that he said were hundreds of oil and gas facilities within approximately 2 square miles. He then showed a photo of dead trees and said they previously bordered a gas facility. Once it began operations, he said the trees began dying and DISH was filled with odors and pollution.

                      He spoke of how the pollution affected his sons who had health issues including nosebleeds in their sleep when odors were the strongest. That caused the family to move 25 miles away and, Tillman said, the boys’ health issues subsided.

                        He showed what he said was an image, taken in Texas, revealing volatile air emissions not visible to the naked eye. Then he showed a similar photo that he said was shot in Bakersfield. Made me choke.

                          He suggested Brea create a task force to develop public policy that protects public health and property.

                            Attorney Damon Nagami of the Natural Resources Defense Council told of pollution caused by all aspects of oil operations, and how the state’s Division of Oil, Gas & Geothermal Resources lacks adequate regulations and oversight.

                              Christie Russell spoke of how her family had worked in the Brea oil industry, but how we must learn more to better understand the risks and rewards of enhanced oil operations.

                                The group emphasized the need for a citizens' advisory board appointed by the City Council.

                                  So will Linn Energy want rebuttal time before the City Council? Not according to company spokeswoman, Sarah Nordin, who said via email, “As it relates to the City Council, Linn will not be providing a rebuttal to any information that was presented as there were no specific comments related to Linn’s operations in the Brea area.”

                                    Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. She gives her perspective on Brea issues twice a month. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net.

  • Council discusses golf course, downtown parking

    3 years ago by

    The Brea City Council chambers were dark Jan. 6, but the council still met that night in its usual third-floor conference room for a public study session followed by a closed session.


      In the past, the first council meeting in January was usually canceled, but not this year.

        Mayor Marty Simonoff went forth with a study session agenda of only two items: an amendment to the Birch Hills Golf Course lease agreement and another parking structure in Brea Downtown. The meeting lasted three hours, with productive discussion by all of the council.

          The council first discussed the lease amendment. The amendment would change the threshold of responsibility for repairs for the Birch Hills Golf Course as part of the lease agreement with Imperial Golf, which will operate the course and clubhouse. The current agreement makes the city responsible for repairs when they reach $5,000. The amendment changes that threshold to $50,000.

            Matt Clabaugh, representing Imperial Golf, said the company would meet with Brea’s staff regarding the amendment. He added that the company plans to use two modulars for the clubhouse and pro shop until a permanent clubhouse is built and that an attractive clubhouse draws more golfers and higher green fees, something a couple of golfers on the council disagreed with.

              The council also discussed a parking structure for Superblock 1, behind the vacant Tower building in Brea Downtown. As I wrote last May, without an additional parking structure in that block facing Brea Boulevard, Brea Downtown will die. One by one, the successful and popular venues will go away, and instead of a downtown, we will have a deadtown.

                Mark Caplow of E.M. Caplow and Associates, owners of the 30,000-square-foot Tower building, said that the one thing holding up a long-term lease of the building is the lack of parking behind it.

                  “I’ve had inquires about it from several high-end companies, but without adequate parking, they don’t want it,” Caplow said. While the former and current councils tend to favor a parking structure with mixed space for commercial or residential use, the downtown owners prefer a parking-only structure behind Tower with a bridge extending across Birch Street to what is now Old Navy. The Brea Improv has plans to take over that spot and transform it into its new comedy club-nightclub concept, like it has done in Irvine. However, it will need more parking.

                    The city’s mixed-use proposal for $13.2million adds 444 spaces, in contrast to an all-parking design by Caplow and Dwight Manley – another major Brea Downtown property owner – that they said can be built for $5million and adds 501 parking spaces. Either way, more parking will keep downtown from becoming deadtown.

                      Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. She gives her perspective on Brea issues twice a month. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net.

  • Brea Girl Scouts awarded highest honor for commendable community service

    3 years ago by

    Brea


      Brianna Clark, left, organized singing and dancing for retirment homes for her Girl Scout Gold Award project. Makayla Warren. right, made video and scripts to help autistic children (courtesy Debby Clark)

      Briana Stempniak organized Camp Fit for her Gold Award Girl Scout project (courtesy Deborah Stempniak)


        Three Brea Girl Scouts were honored at a recent Brea City Council meeting for having been awarded the Gold Award, the highest award in girl scouts. Jill Patterson is the unit manager.

          Brianna Clark organized a group of dancers and singers that perform around Orange County at various retirement homes. She choreographed routines, made costumes, synced music, and taught the dances and routines to her team. There are 3 Dance teams now...in Orange, Anaheim and Brea!

            Briana Stempniak organized Camp Fit. Briana developed a fun, comprehensive education and fitness program that was piloted by the Boys and Girls Club of Brea, Placentia and Yorba Linda. On the first day of camp, over 40 kids signed up. The Boys and Girls Club plan to implement this program at other Boys and Girls Clubs throughout California.

              Makayla Warren made a series of videos and scripts to assist autistic children make and keep friends. She then trained a group of high school students who volunteered at St. Jude for two summers. The team put on the skits and then interacted with the autistic children in the group. Her project helped both groups of kids...the autistic children learned some tips on making friends, and the high school kids learned how to work with and interact with children with special needs. Makayla has received rave reviews and now is thinking about becoming a specialist with autistic children as a career!

                Any news? Give Susan Gaede a jingle 714-529-8561 or e-mail her at suzgaede@aol.com

  • BBON Q&A with 2014 Brea City Council Candidate Brett Murdock

    3 years ago by

    Q&A by Carolyn Campbell


      As in the case of the 2012 City Council election, we are conducting another candidate Q&A to provide residents with detailed information about the 2014 Brea City Council office seekers. In an effort to help voters make an informed decision - we posed seven questions including two-part questions to five candidates, and one incumbent, who are vying for three Brea City Council seats.

        Incumbent: Brett Murdock

          New candidates: Steven Vargas, Cecilia Hupp, Glenn Parker, Michael Kim and Marc Harris.

            With the exception of Marc Harris, their responses are published in the order received.

              And finally, their email and/or website address is included, should you want to comment.

              Brett Murdock


                BBON: Please tell us your background and/or experience?

                  Brett: I have lived in Brea for 37 years and attended Arovista Elementary, Country Hills Elementary, the Brea Junior High, and graduated from the Brea High School. I have a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy and Political Science from UC San Diego and a Juris Doctorate degree from Chapman School of Law. My law practice is here in Brea and I’ve been a small business owner for over 18 years. I was elected to the Brea City Council in November of 2010 and elected Mayor in 2013. I currently represent Brea as the Chair of the Orange County Council of Governments, Chair of the Orange County Waste Management Commission, President of the Orange County Division of the League of California Cities, Chair of the Operations Committee of the Orange County Sanitation District, and Regional councilmember of the Southern California Association of Governments.

                    BBON: People flock to Brea for many reasons. What attracted you to Brea?

                      Brett: I moved here when I was four years old. Brea is a community that has given me so much through great schools, boy scouts, youth sports - the list goes on and on. That same sense of community is the reason why I’ve chosen to make a life here with my wife Roni and son Henry.

                        BBON: What motivated you to run for this position? What do you want to see change?

                          Brett: Brea has given me a lot as a child growing up here and I want to give back. Brea has created a reputation as being one of the best cities around I want to continue the visionary and forward thinking that has made us the envy of so many.

                            BBON: What sets you apart from the other candidates? And do you share similar views with the other candidates?

                              Brett: I have been on the Brea City Council since 2010 and Mayor since December of 2013. I also currently represent Brea as the Chair of the Orange County Council of Governments, Chair of the Orange County Waste Management Commission, President of the Orange County Division of the League of California Cities, Chair of the Operations Committee of the Orange County Sanitation District, and Regional councilmember of the Southern California Association of Governments. This experience as a leader in government has given me the tools to help keep Brea moving forward.

                                BBON: What is the first ordinance you will bring forward on council?

                                  Brett: I have been working very hard to bring the City Council and the School District together to revitalize the Lagos de Moreno Park at Laurel Elementary School. I hope this will be one of the first things we can accomplish together as a community in the new year.

                                    BBON: We are approaching our centennial year in 2017, what do you see as the city’s most significant accomplishments?

                                      Brett: Brea’s focus on a balanced and vibrant economy over the last 40 years by bringing the Mall to Brea, redeveloping the downtown, and encouraging smart growth has been the cornerstone of Brea’s success. This is the reason why Brea has such great community amenities, excellent schools, and superior public services.

                                        My wife is Roni - short for Veronica. My son is Henry - but if you ask him his name, he calls himself "Hank."

                                        BBON: What accomplishments are you proudest of?

                                          Brett: I convinced my amazing wife Roni to marry me and then we had the greatest little boy Henry. We are so lucky to live in this beautiful city.

                                            BrettM@cityofbrea.net

  • BBON Q&A with 2014 Brea City Council Candidate Mike Kim

    3 years ago by

    Q&A by Carolyn Campbell


      As in the case of the 2012 City Council election, we are conducting another candidate Q&A to provide residents with detailed information about the 2014 Brea City Council office seekers. In an effort to help voters make an informed decision - we posed seven questions including two-part questions to five candidates, and one incumbent, who are vying for three Brea City Council seats.

        Incumbent: Brett Murdock

          New candidates: Steven Vargas, Cecilia Hupp, Glenn Parker, Michael Kim and Marc Harris.

            With the exception of Marc Harris, their responses are published in the order received.

              And finally, their email and/or website address is included, should you want to comment.

                Mike Kim


                  BBON: Please tell us your background and/or experience?

                    Mike: I am a Professional Civil Engineer and have provided municipal engineering consultation for cities in Orange and Los Angeles Counties. I have served as Public Works Director/City Engineer and Interim Community Development Director. I have participated and provided consultation in high level decision making processes and critical negotiations involving municipal government administration. I am currently serving as Brea Planning Commissioner.

                      BBON: People flock to Brea for many reasons. What attracted you to Brea?

                        Mike: Brea is a unique and vibrant community that provides residents with convenience, security, and high quality of life. Brea has achieved outstanding accomplishments that are not common in many cities. We have successful regional mall, downtown development that is evolving into a destination location in Orange County, and good education system second to none . Brea is great choice for growing families, and I chose to live in Brea to raise my family. My children have been born, educated, and raised in Brea. Brea has been my home for past 30 years. I have also been a business owner of Brea since 2001.

                          BBON: What motivated you to run for this position? What do you want to see change?

                            Mike: Brea is growing with new developments, changing demographics, and crowding in schools. Brea is facing fiscal challenges such as unfunded public pension system, state claims on local funds, and removal of Redevelopment Agency by the Governor. Brea is also facing tough decisions to continue maintaining good quality fire and safety services. In order to safeguard high quality of life, public safety, and property values in Brea, tough choices and decisions have to be made. It is vital to me and residents of Brea, that vibrant economy and quality of life in Brea needs to be safeguarded. I chose to run at this critical time to offer my vision and expertise to keep Brea moving forward toward brighter future.

                              BBON: What sets you apart from the other candidates? And do you share similar views with the other candidates?

                                Mike: I am a resident and business owner of Brea that shares same concerns with the majority of Brea residents and business owners. I am not a career politician and I do not have any other political aspirations. I believe I have unique qualification as experienced professional engineer and municipal consultant for past 35 years to bring to bear my "nut and bolts" knowledge and experience to make sure right decisions and agreements are made as we move forward with new challenges.

                                  BBON: What is the first ordinance you will bring forward on council?

                                    Mike: Brea has changed from a sleepy oil town to today's dynamic suburban city with new homes, myriad of retail stores, manufacturing companies, research and development firms, and professional service businesses. With growth comes potential for special interests and competitive motivations that will require close scrutiny and improvements in regulations. Therefore, first ordinance that I wish to introduce is to limit political contribution from any one source to $3,000.00 and provide for City Council term limits to consecutive two terms.

                                      BBON: We are approaching our centennial year in 2017, what do you see as the city’s most significant accomplishments?

                                        Mike: Brea has achieved many remarkable accomplishments in nearly 100 years since incorporation as city. Brea has evolved into a vibrant community of homes and businesses from being an oil production community. In recent times, Brea, through diligent planning and effort, became a regional shopping center with development of Brea Mall, an entertainment and dining destination with outstanding downtown redevelopment, development of balanced price range of affordable homes, beautification of commercial areas with Arts in Public Places, full service police and fire departments, and outstanding schools. Therefore, most outstanding accomplishments of Brea is total of all these achievements that has made Brea an enviable community in Orange County.

                                          Top row, left to right: John Dohrmann, Son-in-Law, Krystin Kim Dohrmann, Daughter, Michelle Kim, Daughter, Eric Kim, Son. Bottow row, left to right: Dean Dohrmann, Grandson and Tate Dohrmann, Grandson.


                                            BBON: What accomplishments are you proudest of?

                                              Mike: I have worked all my life to enhance the quality of life for the public as I practice my profession as civil engineer constructing public works improvements. I take great pride in my profession and opportunity to serve the public.
  • BBON to conduct City Council Candidates Q&A

    3 years ago by

    Given our recent repost of the Orange County Register's local news article titled: Councilman's call for change has supporters - we would like to relay to our followers that we are planning to make an equal effort in working towards focusing on all the participants running for a city council seat in the upcoming election on November 4, 2014.


      As our mission clearly states, we stand for unity in keeping Brea a thriving community. And at this time, the consensus clearly has shown that there is definitely a division amongst our council members.

        On that note, we will conduct another election Q&A. As in the past election on November 6, 2012, it will be fair and unbiased and operated on a first come, first served basis. So far candidate Steven Vargas will be featured first with Mayor Brett Murdock second in line.

          BBON will maintain a friendly approach of questions, giving readers a personal perspective on each participant running for a seat on Brea’s city council. Our goal is to further help voters to make an informed decision.

            Stay tuned!

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