Brea Old and New: The go-to source for "All things Brea"!

Terri Daxon

  • Drowning is preventable; someone must take watch

    5 months ago by

    This has been one extra-hot summer, and a dip in the pool sounds great. It can be, especially for the kids, but swimming and playing in the pool can also turn tragic in seconds. So far this summer, we’ve had no drowning incidents in Brea, according the Orange County Fire Authority. But countywide, there have been 22 water-related incidents, including eight in swimming pools, six in the ocean or bay and seven in bathtubs.


      Where there is water, there is the possibility of a drowning. I know that sounds harsh, but an infant or child can drown in a few inches of water.

        It is so preventable with thoughtful caution.

          With swimming pools, if there are kids in the pool, you need a responsible adult, who can swim, to be the water watcher.

            The water watch must do just that. Watch the water and do nothing else. No checking emails or texting, but have a phone handy in case of an emergency. No chatting with someone who “just wants to keep you company.” And no drinking anything stronger than iced tea.

              Water watchers must be willing to do nothing but watch the kids and adults in the pool. It only takes seconds for a young child to go under and drown.

                Brea used to have Water Watcher tags, but you can make your own for the water watcher to hang around his neck. A good reminder of his duty.

                  Last week at the Brea Plunge. a young child had a medical incident in the pool during free swimming time. A lifeguard was on duty. The child was immediately pulled out of the pool, according to Assistant City Manager Chris Emeterio, who said the Brea Fire Department first responders were there moments later. Said Fire Chief Wolfgang Knabe, “Because of quick action by all concerned, there was a happy ending.”

                    If you own a pool or spa, you should make pool safety a priority by having the pool or spa fenced in and self-closing with a latch beyond a child’s reach. According the OCFA, alarms and pool covers are no substitutes for an at least 4-foot-high fence that junior can’t climb over. A responsible pool owner keeps a life preserver, shepherd’s hook and CPR instruction within easy reach. And, of course you should know CPR and first aid.

                      If not, there are classes available through the American Red Cross and other local sources.

                        When the baby or a child is suddenly missing, make the pool or spa the first, not the last, place you look. That is something to emphasize to your child’s caretaker or baby sitter.

                          Pool safety is also important for the elderly. And no one, regardless of age and swimming ability should ever swim alone. Swim with the family; you’ll have more fun.

                            Check out ocgov.com for more pool safety information, or stop by National Night Out from 4 to 7 p.m. on Aug. 1 at the Brea Marketplace. Bring the kids to meet Brea’s police and fire personnel, the SWAT team and K-9 units. There will be finger painting, face painting, free food, safety information and giveaways.

                              Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. She gives her perspective on Brea issues twice a month. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink. net.

  • Brea’s former mayors set the pace for our future

    8 months ago by

    Did you know Brea has 14 living former mayors, all appointed by their peers, 10 who still live in Brea?


      They have presided over Brea during different eras and often under challenging conditions, but I am only highlighting former mayors not currently on council.

        Mayor Lynn Daucher is seen in this 1998 photo at the helm of a bulldozer for the groundbreaking of Brea Downtown. (Courtesy of Lynn Daucher)


          Our living former mayors date back to 1964, when then 28-year-old Thomas Speers was appointed mayor for a two-year term. Speers now lives in Colorado, and recalled how he and his council were successful in changing the position of city administrator to a full-time city manager and other professional staffing needed for a growing city.

            During Rex Gaede’s turn as mayor in 1977, he was instrumental in changing the mayoral term from two years to one year so more council members could serve in the center seat. Gaede’s most memorable mayor moment was presiding over the opening of the Brea Mall, a very big deal for the community.

              Ron Isles, who now lives in Arkansas, served on the council two times, and as mayor in 1982 and again in 1992. He said he worked with the city manager and finance manager to set minimum budget constraints to assure that Brea would always have money and be able to pay its bills. That seems to still be the case today.

                A big change came in 1984 when Norma Arias Hicks Buckeye, now of Fallbrook, was appointed mayor. She was the first woman and first Hispanic to be elected to Brea’s City Council. She was instrumental in getting Sacramento bigwigs to create Chino Hills State Park, and also fought the landfill expansion.

                  Carrey Nelson, our oldest living mayor at age 90, served as mayor in 1984 and 1990. He served 14 years on council, and the downtown’s huge transformation came under his watch.

                    Mayor in 1990, Wayne Wedin said working with a strong team of staff, council and the community was successful as was developing a strong relationship with the school district. He was also instrumental in starting Brea’s Art in Public Places.

                      Burnie Dunlap became mayor in 1992, 1993 and 1996. A highlight of being mayor was the completion of the Brea Community Center. He now lives in Anaheim Hills, but says he still loves Brea!

                        Bev Perry, mayor in 1995, 2000 and 2003, became mayor in 1995 and the next day Orange County declared bankruptcy. She spent much of that year in meetings with other O.C. cities who also had money invested with the county. In the end, she said, they were able to craft a deal that returned nearly all of Brea’s money back to the city.

                          Lynn Daucher, mayor 1997-98, said her most memorable mayor moment was at the downtown groundbreaking in October 1998. She said it was culmination of years of hard work by several city councils, but the best part was Daucher at the controls of the bulldozer. Something I doubt she has repeated.

                            John Beauman, mayor in 2004 and 2009, especially enjoyed commemorating the Brea Sports Park opening in 2008, and also serving as president of the Orange County Division of the League of California Cities.

                              Former police chief Bill Lentini was mayor in 2004. His goal on council was to help bring civility back to our local government and finally make the sports park a reality. During his mayoral year, he saw the revitalization of South Brea Boulevard and safeguards set for the hillsides.

                                Don Schweitzer was mayor in 2008 and 2012, following in the mayoral footsteps from the past of his father and grandfather. His favorite accomplishment as mayor was presenting the idea of a Brea war memorial, getting it funded and finally built.

                                  Ron Garcia served as Brea’s mayor in 2006. Unfortunately he did not respond to my requests.

                                    Brett Murdock served as Brea’s mayor in 2014 and worked hard on the Lagos de Moreno Park rehabilitation project at Laurel School. “It will be an incredible addition to our great city and school district,” he said.

                                      Murdock is the only former mayor who stated he is seriously considering running again for office. Which one? He didn’t say.

                                        Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. She gives her perspective on Brea issues twice a month. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net.

  • Birch Hills Golf Course Clubhouse now open

    1 year ago by

    Back in 2011, the Birch Hills Golf Course was is major renovations and swathed in green fencing cloth with signs that stated, “Thank you for your patience.”


      Some of us wondered if it would ever be completed, but in May the 18-hole executive course finally reopened, and it is a real beauty. Driving or walking by one always sees many golfers on the lush course with rolling hills and water features.

        While the golf course is first class and popular, it lacked a new clubhouse to replace the old, dinky one that was previously there.

          But that has finally changed.
          The view inside the new clubhouse at Birch Hills Golf Course.

          The view inside the new clubhouse at Birch Hills Golf Course.


            Imperial Golf, operators of the golf course, now have a clubhouse that includes the TreeHouse Restaurant, opened in October, a causal, family-friendly indoor-outdoor dining spot. And it is not just popular with golfers, said Imperial principal, Matt Clabaugh,

              “We get about 50-50 golfers and other folks,” he said, adding that the lunch and after-work crowd continues to grow, especially with people from the nearby office buildings on Birch Street and other locals. The daily happy hour and dinner menu might be attracting some of the after-work crowd. The restaurant is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner every day until 10 pm.

                But I think it would be difficult to just stop in for a quick bite at noon and go back to work because TreeHouse has huge, east and west facing glass walls that fully open to phenomenal views.

                  Clabaugh said the view at sunset is unbelievable. I’m afraid I’d just want to pull up a chair, maybe by one of the three outdoor fire pits, and just sit back and enjoy the view, which includes Segment 5 of the Tracks at Brea trail that is completed, but yet to open.

                    According to Bill Bowlus, Brea’s public works director, there are just a few items to wrap up, including some type of pass through for bikers and hikers, and then the trail will open. Hooray.

                      The trail meanders through the golf course and includes an interpretive rest stop with a replica of an old Red Car, like the ones that used to be in Brea. Of course, the rest stop is at the clubhouse and restaurant.

                        The restaurant, which Clabaugh described as efficient, casual and contemporary, can accommodate banquets for up to 75 people.

                          “We’ve already had some golf tournament banquets and sports groups award ceremonies in our restaurant,” he said. It could be a good spot for Brea Chamber of Commerce lunches and mixers too.

                            Something I didn’t expect to find at a golf clubhouse-restaurant is weekly live music. Clabaugh said they also plan some star walks and moon walks, once the trail opens. And you thought Birch Hills was just for golf!

                              But the official grand opening will not be until January or February, Clabaugh said. Perhaps they will coordinate it with Brea’s big Centennial Celebration Feb. 17, which begins with a community parade starting from Birch Hills Golf Course to the Sports Park to celebrate Brea’s 100th birthday.

                                Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net.

  • Brea Kiwanis Club’s back-to-school shopping gets an A

    1 year ago by

    I love shoes and remember going shoe shopping with my mom and begging to wear the new pair home.


      I liked nothing better than seeing my old shoes placed in the box and looking down at the new pair on my feet. Pure joy for a 9-year-old.

        But there are kids in our community who don’t often have brand new pair of shoes, nor many clothes that are not hand-me-downs or thrift store bargains. No joy in that.

          But joy comes to the kids who are chosen by their school principals to partake in the Brea Kiwanis’ annual back-to-school shopping trip at JC Penney in the Brea Mall.

            Since 1998, the Brea Kiwanis Club has partnered with JC Penney ll to offer a special Saturday morning back to school shopping trip. Last year, Soroptimist of Brea/La Habra, of which I am a member, also donated funds and volunteers to help shop, as did Placentia Kiwanians. We all shopped for 64 children.

              This year, through funds raised by the Kiwanis, Soroptimist, Brea Citizens Bank and La Floresta/Chevron, about 70 children are receiving new clothes and shoes.

                The parents are not allowed into the store, but there is seating for them in the lower level parking structure. JC Penney even provides coffee and doughnuts.

                  Prior to the big shopping day, the children are given a letter for their parents explaining the program, a list to be filled out regarding sizes and colors for the child. Clothing bought can only be exchanged in the child’s size, not refunded.

                    Each child will have a shopper from the Kiwanis or Soroptimist or the Kiwanis’ Brea Olinda High Key Club, who will shop the children’s department with them and have $100 per child to spend.

                      I was a shopper last year and shopped with two different children. First was a 9-year old boy who headed first for the $75 famous name shoes. I guided him away from them and to the jeans, shirts and socks, where our $100 could go farther. He picked out some clothes he liked and Mom would approve of, and then we headed to the sale shoes where he found famous name shoes within our budget that fit and he loved. We had enough left over for new undies and pajamas too. Of course, if JC Penney had not put nearly everything in the children’s departments on sale, that $100 would not have gone as far.

                        Not only will lots of cool clothes be on sale, but the JC Penney’s staff work on their own time, and many of them prior to their regular Saturday shift. “Penney’s staff raise money themselves and donate to us to help more children,” said Dean Hall, Brea Kiwanis president, “this year they raised $500 for five children.”

                          Next Sept. 10 will be another Kiwanis’ back to school shopping morning at JC Penney. I can’t wait.

                            Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net.

  • At last, new downtown parking structure coming soon

    1 year ago by

    Finally we can look forward to having ample packing in the Super Block 1 lot downtown between the old Tower Records building and Taps Fish House & Brewery.


      Construction on the long-awaited and urgently needed parking structure is scheduled to begin in late September.

        The cost for the design, engineering and construction is $10.3 million, not $12 million as previously estimated.

          Funding is coming from the city’s Fixed Asset and Replacement Fund, the Community Benefit and Economic Fund, proceeds from a 2011 bond, a $3.9 million loan from the landfill mitigation fund and a $2.9 million loan from the General Fund. No taxes will, or can, be raised to pay for the parking structure, and the money loaned from the landfill mitigation funds and the general fund are to be repaid.

            The structure would have cost much, much less if back in the 1990s the council had listened to Councilman Roy Moore who envisioned the future need of a parking structure on the eastside of Brea Boulevard.

              According to David Crabtree, Brea’s community development director, the construction of the four-level, 478-space garage will take about a year, and the entire parking lot will be fenced off during that time. Ouch.

                After the parking lot becomes a construction zone, there will be challenges for the Super Block 1 businesses, including Lillie’s Q, Buffalo Wild Wings, the military recruitment offices and Taps, which will all remain open for business, so do patronize them. Valet parking will be available.

                  What will not be available is Brea Downtown’s popular Jazz Festival.

                    Said major downtown property owner, Dwight Manley via email, “The Brea Downtown Owners Association has suspended the Jazz Festival due to the parking lot closure, as well as the money the BDOA is spending to subsidize the valet during that period.”

                      The Brea Downtown Owners Association and the valet company are finalizing a plan offering lower valet rates during the parking lot closure, thanks to the association’s subsidization. That plan will soon be submitted to the city for approval.

                        Crabtree said the valets would park cars at the Gaslight Center, in Super Block 2 and other spots in the downtown.

                          The building of parking structure, however, will not be the only construction zone in the downtown at that time. Manley said Old Navy will be leaving in January, and the new Improv’s construction on that site should begin in February 2017.

                            Maybe when Old Navy is demolished, the wrecking ball will swing wide and take down the very tired-looking Tower building. It has had only temporary renters since Tower Records and Books shut down in 2005. It was a showcase building back then, but not now. And it will only look worse across the street from the razzle-dazzle Improv Entertainment Center with two showrooms, fine dining spots and all the amenities to make it an entertainment destination. Surely it will attract other entertainment venues and new restaurants to the downtown.

                              All the construction will be a pain, but worth celebrating once it is done. Can’t wait.

                                Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications.

  • Discovering Cuba – a country of contrasts

    2 years ago by

    Terri Daxon, pictured third from the left, poses with her North Orange County Chamber of Commerce group during a trip to Cuba.

    Terri Daxon, pictured third from the left, poses with her North Orange County Chamber of Commerce group during a trip to Cuba.


      It was an opportunity not to be missed: Seven days visiting Cuba before throngs of American tourists and companies invade it.

        Our group of 37, booked through five Chambers of Commerce across the country, met in Miami for our “people-to-people” Cuban visit. Seven of us came from the North Orange County Chamber of Commerce to see and experience that intriguing island, once the playground of America’s rich and famous.

          Cuba of 2016 is a muddle of contrasts and often stuck in the past. We traveled in a modern Chinese-made touring bus, but I felt like we’d entered the 19th century. Our fancy bus whizzed down the highway, passing horse-drawn wooden wagons. Other times, we’d see oxen pulling a plow, or a goat-drawn wagon. Not everyone in Cuba drives a ’52 Chevy, or a Yank Tank as the old American cars are called, and many Cubans don’t own cars.

            While I expected to see Yank Tanks, I also expected a heavy military and police presence, including armored trucks and tanks, but did not. I’ve seen heavier police presence in New York’s Times Square than in Havana. We had no restrictions where we could go, and were only advised not to photograph at airports or military facilities.

              At Ernesto “Che” Guevara’s mausoleum and museum soldiers were present. My friend and I had our photo taken with a soldier on guard. He had a small, holstered pistol, no Uzi or bullet bandolier. And he smiled for the photo. Che’s image is everywhere on buildings, T-shirts and statues, especially in Havana.

                We learned from our Cuban guide, Yarni, that only recently were Cubans allowed at the beach resorts were we stayed for a few days. But the cost is prohibitive since Cubans earn about $20 a month. Yarni’s doctor husband earns $60 a month.

                  While the beaches are postcard beautiful, valleys breathtaking, Havana’s sleek, modern structures are often next to old, crumbling buildings.

                    The Rolling Stones gave a free concert in Havana weeks before we attended a park concert where musicians played beautifully with very old instruments. Contrasts everywhere.

                      Even their currency is a contrast. Visitors use Cuban Convertible Pesos, or CUCs. Cuban nationals are often paid in both CUCs and CUPs, or Cuban Pesos. CUCs are more valuable. And American credit and debit cards are not accepted, but are expected to be soon.

                        While Cubans are still issued ration books for buying staples, and often face shortages, we were served cruise-line quality cuisine at our hotels and paladars, or family-run restaurants.

                          Our hotels had cable television with CNN, not available to the locals. Internet service is spotty, but many Cubans have cell phones and gather around a hot spot.

                            Cuba is a country of contrasts and is in transition; slowly working its way into the 21st century with friendly people who have a glimmer of hope for a more open, brighter future that I hope includes freedom of press.

                              Terri Daxon, a freelance writer, is the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net.

  • On track with the Tracks at Brea Trail

    2 years ago by

    Until 2007, trains regularly chugged through Brea, crossing Lambert Road, State College Boulevard and Brea Boulevard. Only one track that crosses Berry Street is still somewhat active.


      Like many cities throughout Southern California, Brea ended up with a lot of ugly, abandoned railroad tracks that carried nothing but weeds, trash and rodents.

        But no longer.

          Back in 2009, the first community meetings were held to find a way to convert the abandoned rails to trails for walking, running and biking, instead of places people dumped trash or old mattresses after dark.

            Through good planning, many grants and keen determination by residents and city staff, The Tracks at Brea is nearly completed. But it hasn’t been an easy task.

              When the project began, Brea was flush with Redevelopment Agency funds. According to Brea’s economic development manager, Kathie DeRobbio, $11 million in redevelopment funds were used for property acquisition and early project planning. Then the California legislature voted to end redevelopment agencies and Brea had to pursue other sources for the project. The city started applying for grants.

                At present, $17.5 million in grants has funded much of the project, including the extensive and expensive soil remediation, design, engineering construction and landscaping.

                  “The council has authorized $1,258,000 in Park Development Funds,” DeRobbio said about the city’s contribution toward the price tag. She added that, depending on the actual costs to be incurred, the city might not spend that entire amount. Those funds are restricted for use only for new recreational facilities.

                    There will be six segments of the 4-mile trail at completion. It starts with Segment I through Arovitsa Park and presently ends behind the west parking structure downtown where Segment 2 will someday begin.

                      But the really big news is the grand opening at 9:30 a.m. on March 26 when Mayor Christine Marrick leads the community through the newly completed Segment 3, a three-quarter-mile jaunt starting by Fire Station No. 2 on Brea Boulevard and meandering east to State College Boulevard.

                        The trails are wonderfully landscaped, park-like paths for strolling with the kids or whizzing through on your bike.

                          Bikers use the two-way, paved paths while walkers and runners use the tan-colored paths made of decomposed granite that is often used for playgrounds.

                            There are no restrooms or drinking fountains yet in Segment 3, but there are public restrooms nearby in the downtown. Go before you go and carry water, especially for the kids. There are disposal stations for dog waste.

                              The next segment nearing completion is No. 5, which wanders through Birch Hills Golf Course. It will have an interpretive historical display, rest area and food and restrooms available. And, you won’t have to duck when someone yells, “Fore!” because the golfers will be playing away from the trail.

                                Segment 4 will continue across State College and travels under the 57 Freeway to Kraemer Boulevard, where Segment 6 will run nearly parallel to Birch Street, ending at Valencia Street.

                                  If you plan to break in Segment 3 with the mayor, DeRobbio suggests parking in east parking structure downtown. Or, you could do what I’m going to do and walk there.

                                    The trail is open daily, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

                                      Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net.

  • Daxon: Local spending funds summer events and fills potholes

    2 years ago by

    We hear “buy local” everywhere, but does it really make a difference to our city’s coffers?


      It certainly does.

        “Sales tax makes up 42 percent of the city’s revenues,” City Manager Bill Gallardo said.

          That 42 percent is approximately $21 million for fiscal year 2015-16. But, which businesses in Brea are the biggest sales tax revenue generators?

            “Brea Mall is a large contributor,” said Alicia Brenner, Brea’s senior management analyst via email, “and roughly represents 30 percent of the sales tax revenues.” That is significant, especially because four of the city’s top-10 sales tax generators are located in the mall.

              In fact, the city rakes in the most sales tax revenue from the mall’s Apple Store. All of us iMac, iPhone, iWatch and iPad fans can now take a bow.

                Following Apple in second place is Beckman Coulter, which is also one of Brea’s top employers. In third place is Home Depot, Macy’s comes in fourth place, then Nordstrom’s, Russell Sigler (HVAC distributors), Target, Tesla, wholesale distributor Walter’s Electric and in the 10 spot is Walmart.

                  I am surprised that Tesla isn’t higher on the list. That cool $80,000 Tesla you’ve been eyeing will have $6,400 in sales tax tagged on to it. I find it amazing that all the Apple iStuff sold at the Brea Mall store beats out a year’s worth of Tesla sales tax revenue at the same location.

                    And where does the tax revenue go?

                      First, it goes into the general fund and is then disbursed to support many city programs and services, including police and fire, according to Gallardo. Those taxes also go toward the many amenities that make Brea a nice place to live.

                        Do you enjoy driving on pothole-free city streets? Thank the guy down the street wearing an iWatch and driving his new Tesla while wearing clothing recently purchased at Macy’s and Nordstrom’s. Nice.

                          Besides helping fund pothole repair and other city maintenance, those sales tax dollars help keep the Community Center and Senior Center in operation and the free senior bus on the road.

                            Brea’s tax bucks also help fund the Family Resource Center, Tiny Tots, the Community Center’s Teen Zone, the fitness center, the annual Wellness Festival, the Nutcracker and Spring boutiques, the annual bridal show and other Community Center events.

                              The city-sponsored summer activities, such as Concerts in the Park, Family Film Night in Arovista Park, the July 4 Country Fair and Brea Fest, all receive funding generated by sales tax revenue. The Curtis Theatre, Brea Art Gallery and Art in Public Places also enjoy the benefits of Brea’s healthy sales tax revenue.

                                Another recipient of funding thanks to sales tax revenue is the Tracks at Brea Trail, Brea’s long-awaited rails-to-trails project. The largest segment of the paved and landscaped trail, between State College and Brea boulevards, is scheduled to open in March for walkers, runners and bike riders too. A portion of 4-mile the trail meanders through the Birch Hills Golf Course.

                                  So much of what we enjoy in Brea comes from sales tax. That’s my excuse for shopping more.

                                    Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. Contact her at daxon comm@earthlink.net.

  • Don’t be a victim of card skimmers

    2 years ago by

    By TERRI DAXON


      CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST

        Recently, I was the victim of a gas pump skimmer, a device attached to a gas pump’s card reader where you insert your credit card for payment. Skimmers are usually difficult to detect and can be installed in less than a minute, according authorities.

          The day I got skimmed I purchased about $38 worth of gas for my car. I used my American Express card for that purchase, but made no other purchases with it after that. I use that card mainly for automatic payments for my gym membership and other reoccurring monthly fees.

            The next day, American Express informed me that a charge of more than $7,900 was attempted with the card in Florida. Then four more charges were attempted in Florida with that card number – all denied by AmEx. Fortunately, AmEx refused all of the fraudulent charges, canceled my card and issued me a new one.

              So how did thugs obtain my credit card information? Very likely through a gas pump skimmer at the station, because I didn’t use the card anywhere else.

                Then I wondered if other people had the same experience and posted a message about what happened to me on Nextdoor.com  . Immediately there were posts from many people who said they had been skimmed at that same gas station and a few others in Brea.

                  According to Jerry Glomboske, a Brea Police Department service officer, it is usually difficult to pinpoint where the card skimming occurred. That is because many of us use the same credit card to purchase gasoline as we do for groceries, shoes and restaurant meals. But one person on Nextdoor stated $140 in charges was attempted in Oklahoma the same day as she bought gasoline and hadn’t used her card elsewhere.

                    After my conversations with Glomboske on possible skimming at the station, the readers were checked by Brea police officers, but it had been at least two weeks since my skimming experience. No surprise that no skimmers were found. But Glomboske advises skimming victims to make a police report when a theft happens and try to identify where you think it happened.

                      Besides gas stations, skimming often occurs in restaurants and bars. So what do we do, carry wads of cash everywhere we go?

                        Some Nextdoor respondents lauded Costco gas stations because, besides cheaper gas prices, they have attendants walking around, keeping a keen eye on the pump readers. None of the 30-some respondents said they were skimmed at Costco.

                          Glomboske and Internet sources, including security expert Brian Krebs at krebsonsecurity.com, advise frequently checking your accounts for unauthorized use. Avoid using your debit card for purchases because the funds come directly from your bank account. Also, if the state inspector’s seal is broken, don’t buy gas at that pump, or at that station.

                            Let’s all be more aware in 2016.

                              Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net. Don’t be a victim of card skimmers on Page 2 of Friday, January 01, 2016 issue of OCR - StarProgress

  • Daxon: Shop ’til you drop for Brea Community Emergency Council

    2 years ago by

    December arrived and the holiday decorations and Santa have been around for weeks. It is time to get serious about holiday gifting.


      A great way to start is by adding the Brea Community Emergency Council’s annual Holiday Basket Program to your gift list. The council plans to make the holidays brighter for around 200 families and needs our help by Dec. 16. No one should go hungry on Christmas day, or any day, especially children and the elderly.

        Brea Community Emergency Council is a nonprofit organization that has been helping Breans in need for about 60 years, according to nearly 30-year member and long-time president Bill Higgins, who is also the chairman of the holiday project.

          How can we help? A good way to start is at the grocery store or your kitchen pantry. In order to fill 200 baskets – they are really boxes – the council needs canned food, peanut butter, cereal, pasta, beans, rice and other dried foods, household cleaning products, personal care products, including soap, paper products and razors. See something on sale? Pick up a couple to donate. But please do not donate expired food or dented cans. We don’t want to make people sick.

            If your children attend Brea’s public schools, you probably are aware of the collection boxes at each school. There are also donation boxes at the Brea Community Center, the Civic Center, the Brea Senior Center and for the first time, at Ralph’s in the Gateway Center.

              “The new manager wanted to get involved in a local community event to help the needy,” said Higgins via email. I’d say that is definitely the holiday and Brea spirit!

                On Dec. 18, after 1 p.m., council volunteers will bring all the collection boxes to the Brea Olinda High School cafeteria and sort the contents by categories. Starting at 8 a.m. on Dec. 19, more volunteers will show up to fill the holiday boxes with items from as many categories of food and household products that they can fit into each box. The families receiving the boxes will come to pick them up starting at noon.

                  My fellow Soroptimist of Brea/La Habra Club members and I help out each year, and we’ll be there this year, as will members of other Brea service clubs and community volunteers.

                    To help fill the boxes on Dec. 19, just show up at the high school cafeteria and be prepared to work. And if you or someone you know is in need of a big box of groceries this holiday season, call 714-529-6776.

                      Hate to shop? Higgins added that council needs cash and checks too, because it works all year with the Brea Family Resource Center, Active Christians Today, the Brea Ministerial Association and other groups helping families and individuals with everything from food to tires so someone can get to their new job.

                        Drop off your tax-deductible donations at the high school on Dec. 19 or mail to BCEC, P.O. Box 8624, Brea, 92822.

                          Terri Daxon is a freelance writer and the owner of Daxon Marketing Communications. Contact her at daxoncomm@earthlink.net.

»